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About Acid reflux

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Acid reflux is a common condition that occurs when stomach acid rushes back into the tube that connects your mouth and stomach (the esophagus). Recurring acid reflux is known as Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which stomach acid (acid reflux) might irritate your esophageal lining.

Acid reflux affects a large number of people at some point in their lives. GERD is defined as mild acid reflux occurring at least twice a week or moderate to severe acid reflux occurring at least once a week. Most people can control their GERD symptoms with a combination of lifestyle modifications and over-the-counter medicines. Some patients with GERD, however, may require more intensive medications or surgery to alleviate their symptoms.

Common Medication
Treatment Options

Below is a list of common medications used to treat acid reflux and chronic acid reflux disease, which a doctor or provider can prescribe to you for just $5 through SesameRx.

Please note that all prescriptions are at the discretion of your doctor.

Below are common treatment options for acid reflux and GERD. During your appointment, talk to your doctor about what treatment plan is right for you.
FAQs

Acid Reflux Care

When should I see a GI doctor?

You will want to see a GI doctor for any conditions related to the digestive or GI tracts, which encompass the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas, gallbladder, bile ducts, and liver.

Your primary care doctor may refer you to a gastroenterologist if you're experiencing abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea or constipation, heartburn, acid reflux, bloating, black bowel movements, rectal bleeding, sudden and unexplainable weight loss, having difficulty swallowing, and more.

Starting at the age of 50, it is also a good idea to start getting screened routinely for rectal and colon cancer with an endoscopic procedure known as a colonoscopy.

If you're looking to see a gastroenterologist in Meridian, ID, but don't know where to begin, let Sesame help. Sesame offers simple, online booking with real, quality GI doctors at affordable upfront prices. The best part is, Sesame works with doctors to set their prices directly on the site. That means you pay a one-time price, without the hassles of insurance networks. Save up to 60% on a new-patient visit today by booking through Sesame.

What is a gastroenterologist?

A gastroenterologist is a physician who specializes in the management of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and liver. Because of their specialized medical training in gastroenterology, endoscopic procedures led by a gastroenterologist often lead to more accurate detection of polyps and cancer with fewer complications.

The most common conditions, diseases, and disorders diagnosed and treated by gastroenterologists include:
- Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
- Heartburn
- Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
- Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
- Celiac disease
- Gallbladder or liver disease
- Acid reflux
- Hemorrhoids
- Digestive diseases
- Cancer (gastrointestinal, liver, pancreas, colon, rectal)


What conditions does a gastroenterologist treat?

Your primary care provider may refer you to a GI specialist to receive medical advice and treatment for a number of conditions, including:
- Acid reflux
- Ulcers
- Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)
- Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
- Hepatitis
- Hemorrhoids
- Gallstones
- Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
- Lactose intolerance
- Pancreatitis


For conditions of the liver, you may be referred to a herpetologist - a GI doctor with special expertise in liver conditions.

When should I see a gastroenterology specialist?

Gastroenterologists specialize in any conditions related to the digestive or gastrointestinal tracts, which encompass the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, pancreas, gallbladder, bile ducts, and liver.

Your primary care provider may refer you to a gastroenterologist if you're experiencing abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea or constipation, heartburn, acid reflux, bloating, black bowel movements, rectal bleeding, sudden and unexplainable weight loss, having difficulty swallowing, and more.

Starting at the age of 50, it is recommended that you start getting screened routinely for rectal and colon cancer with an endoscopic procedure known as a colonoscopy.

What is pantoprazole?

Pantoprazole is a prescription medication used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition that causes heartburn and esophagus damage. It can be used to alleviate symptoms of GERD, heal acid damage to the stomach and esophagus, and help prevent stomach ulcers. Pantoprazole may even be able to help reduce your risk of developing esophageal cancer.

GERD affects more than 3 million Americans each year. It occurs when the acid and bile that your stomach uses to digest food begins to creep up into the esophagus, damaging your esophageal lining and causing uncomfortable side effects like heartburn.

What is pantoprazole used to treat?

Pantoprazole is most often prescribed to treat symptoms associated with GERD. GERD causes stomach acid and bile - integral to digesting food - to enter the esophagus and throat, irritating the lining and causing uncomfortable side effects. Pantoprazole is effective in treating Erosive Esophagitis, an inflammation caused by GERD that damages the esophagus.

Pantoprazole can be prescribed to alleviate other conditions resulting from the stomach’s overproduction of acid. This includes Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, in which tumors on the pancreas stimulate an overproduction of acid in the stomach.

What are common side effects of pantoprazole?

While there are some common side effects associated with pantoprazole, it is important to remember that your doctor prescribed this drug because its ability to treat your GERD symptoms outweighs any adverse effects it may cause.

Some common side effects of pantoprazole, however, may include:

Headache Diarrhea Nausea Abdominal pain Vomiting Flatulence Dizziness Arthralgia (joint pain)

Rare but more serious side effects of pantoprazole may include:

Blistering or peeling skin Rash hives; itching; swelling of the eyes, face, lips, mouth, throat, or tongue; difficulty breathing or swallowing; or hoarseness Irregular, fast, or pounding heartbeat muscle spasms; uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body; excessive tiredness; lightheadedness; or seizures Severe diarrhea with watery stools, stomach pain, or fever that does not go away Rash on cheeks or arms that is sensitive to sunlight Increased or decreased urination, blood in urine, fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite, fever, rash, or joint pain

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your doctor right away.

This is not a complete list of side effects associated with pantoprazole. For more information on pantoprazole side effects, please visit the National Institutes of Health’s DailyMed page.

How long does it take for pantoprazole to work?

You may start to feel better within 2-3 days of beginning pantoprazole. Limiting your body’s production of stomach acid is a complex process, though, and it may take up to 4 weeks for pantoprazole to take full effect.

How does pantoprazole work?

Pantoprazole belongs to a class of drugs known as proton pump inhibitors. These drugs cause a significant, long-term reduction in stomach acid production. Pantoprazole works by blocking a complex process called hydrogen potassium ATPase. Put simply, this is the process that acidifies the stomach and produces the chemicals it needs to break down food. Pantoprazole limits this process, placing a limit on the amount of acid the stomach produces and reducing the likelihood that acid will enter the esophagus and cause damage and discomfort.

What is famotidine?

Famotidine is a prescription medication used to treat a range of conditions caused when your body overproduces stomach acid. Generic for the brand name Pepcid, it is often used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition that causes heartburn and esophagus damage. GERD affects more than 3 million Americans each year. It occurs when the acid and bile that your stomach uses to digest food begins to creep up into the esophagus, damaging and irritating its lining.

Famotidine is also prescribed to help heal ulcers and prevent their recurrence. It can even treat Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, a condition in which tumors on the pancreas cause an increase in stomach acid production.

Lower-strength famotidine is available over-the-counter and can be used to treat heartburn and indigestion.

What is famotidine used to treat?

Doctors prescribe famotidine to treat a gastroesophageal condition caused by the overproduction of acid in your stomach. Generally speaking, stomach acid is a good thing; it helps your body break down food into the nutrients you need to thrive. When the stomach begins to produce more acid than it needs for digestion, however, conditions like GERD may occur.

Famotidine is an effective treatment for GERD, a condition in which stomach acid enters the esophagus, irritating its gentle lining, causing uncomfortable side effects like heartburn, and leaving you at a higher risk of developing more serious conditions, like esophageal cancer.

Famotidine can also be used to treat stomach and intestinal ulcers and prevent them from returning. It can treat Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, in which tumors on the pancreas stimulate an overproduction of acid in the stomach.

You can purchase lower-strength Famotidine over the counter at most pharmacies. Nonprescription famotidine helps relieve symptoms like heartburn and indigestion.

What are common side effects of famotidine?

While there are some common side effects associated with famotidine, it is important to remember that your doctor prescribed this drug because its ability to treat your GERD symptoms outweighs any adverse effects it may cause.

You may still, however, experience some side effects after starting famotidine. These may include:

Headache Dizziness Constipation Diarrhea

While these side effects are common, contact your doctor if your symptoms are severe or if they do not go away.

Rare but serious side effects, which occur in fewer than 1% of people taking famotidine, may include:

Fever, asthenia, fatigue Palpitations Elevated liver enzymes, vomiting, nausea, abdominal discomfort, anorexia, dry mouth Thrombocytopenia Orbital edema, rash, conjunctival injection, bronchospasm Musculoskeletal pain, arthralgia Seizure, hallucinations, depression, anxiety, decreased libido, insomnia, somnolence Pruritus, dry skin, flushing Tinnitus, taste disorder Impotence

If you are experiencing these symptoms, contact your doctor.

This is not a complete list of side effects. To learn more about side effects associated with famotidine, visit the National Institutes of Health’s DailyMed page for famotidine.

How does famotidine work?

Famotidine belongs to a family of drugs known as H2 blockers. These drugs help reduce GERD symptoms and treat ulcers by reducing the amount of acid that the stomach produces. To get into the science of it, certain cells within your stomach are tasked with creating stomach acid, which your body needs to digest food and kill germs. H2 blockers prevent these cells from producing excess acid, helping reduce your GERD symptoms.

What is omeprazole?

Omeprazole is a prescription medication used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition that causes heartburn and esophagus damage. Omeprazole - generic for the brand name Prilosec OTC - reduces the amount of acid your stomach produces while also helping to heal the lining of your esophagus, the tube between your stomach and mouth that can be damaged by acrid stomach acids.

GERD affects more than 3 million Americans each year. It occurs when the acid and bile that your stomach uses to digest food begins to creep up into the esophagus, damaging and irritating its lining.

Omeprazole can also be used to treat stomach ulcers and, in its lower-dose, over-the-counter form, to treat everyday heartburn.

What is omeprazole used to treat?

Omeprazole is prescribed to treat GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). GERD causes stomach acid and bile - integral to digesting food - to enter the esophagus and throat, irritating the lining and causing uncomfortable side effects, like heartburn.

Omexaprole doesn’t just treat GERD, it has shown to be effective in addressing a number of conditions related to the stomach’s overproduction of acid. It can treat Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, for example, as well as stomach and intestinal ulcers. Omezaprole can also be taken to prevent the recurrence of stomach ulcers.

Low-dose omeprazole is available over-the-counter at most pharmacies and drug stores and can be used to treat heartburn. While heartburn is common every once in a while, contact your doctor if you are experiencing it more than twice a week. This could be a sign of GERD.

What are common side effects of omeprazole?

While there are some common side effects associate with omeprazole, it is important to remember that your doctor prescribed this drug because its ability to alleviate your GERD symptoms outweighs any adverse effects it may cause.

Some common side effects, however, may include:

Constipation Gas Nausea Diarrhea Vomiting Headache

Rare but serious side effects of omeprazole may include: rash hives itching swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing hoarseness irregular, fast, or pounding heartbeat excessive tiredness dizziness lightheadedness muscle spasms, cramps, or weakness jitteriness uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body seizures severe diarrhea with watery stools, stomach pain, or fever that does not go away rash on cheeks or arms that is sensitive to sunlight increased or decreased urination, blood in urine, fatigue, nausea, loss of appetite, fever, rash, or joint pain

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your doctor immediately.

This is not a complete list of side effects associated with omeprazole. For more information on side effects, please visit the National Institutes of Health’s DailyMed page.

How does omeprazole work?

Omeprazole belongs to a class of drugs known as proton pump inhibitors. These drugs cause a significant, long-term reduction in stomach acid production. Omeprazole works by blocking a complex process called hydrogen potassium ATPase. Put simply, this is the process that acidifies the stomach and produces the chemicals it needs to break down food. Omeprazole limits this process, placing a limit on the amount of acid the stomach produces and reducing the likelihood that acid will enter the esophagus and cause damage and discomfort.

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