Affordable Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Testing in Pocatello, ID

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Quest Diagnostics

Chlamydia & gonorrhea test

2001 S Woodruff Ave Suite 7, Idaho Falls, ID 99654
Laboratory
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FAQs

Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Tests

What are chlamydia and gonorrhea tests?

Chlamydia and gonorrhea tests are simple forms of testing used to detect the presence of these sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Both of these diseases are caused by a bacterial infection spread through oral, vaginal, or anal sex. Women may pass gonorrhea to an unborn child if they have not been treated for the condition while pregnant.

In many cases, chlamydia and gonorrhea cause little to no symptoms. This makes it difficult to tell whether or not you have been infected with the bacteria that cause these diseases. Because of this, it is important to undergo screening for gonorrhea or chlamydia if you think you may have an infection, or if you are at an increased risk of contracting one of these diseases. These STDs can cause serious complications if left untreated.

Who should be tested for chlamydia and gonorrhea?

Chlamydia and gonorrhea commonly affect younger individuals (ages 15-24). The CDC recommends that sexually active women under the age of 25 receive yearly tests for both of these infections. Other individuals who are at an increased risk of infection - and who should receive yearly testing - include:
- Men who have sex with men
- Men or women who have multiple sexual partners
- Men or women who engage in unprotected sex
- Men or women who have previously been diagnosed with an STD
- Men or women who have had a sex partner previously diagnosed with an STD
- Men or women who have been diagnosed with HIV/ AIDS


What are the symptoms of chlamydia and gonorrhea?

Both chlamydia and gonorrhea are common bacterial infections. In many cases, these diseases result in little to no symptoms. However, in other cases, symptoms include:

Gonorrhea

Common symptoms of gonorrhea in men include:


  • Pain during urination
  • Off-color discharge from the penis
  • Testicular pain

Common symptoms in women include:


  • Pain during urination
  • Bleeding between menstrual periods or after sexual intercourse
  • Pain in the lower abdomen or pelvis
  • White or yellowish vaginal discharge

In addition to infecting the genitals, gonorrhea can infect the rectum, the eyes, and the throat. The most common symptoms of these infections include pain and discharge from the affected area. Pregnant women can pass a gonorrhea infection to their babies during childbirth. This can lead to serious medical conditions such as blindness and sores on the body.

While early symptoms of gonorrhea are generally mild - sometimes even unnoticeable - if the infection is left untreated, it can lead to serious complications. These include:


  • Infertility
  • Increased risk of HIV/ AIDS
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • Heart and brain damage
  • Joint infection

Chlamydia

Common symptoms of chlamydia include:


  • Clear or white discharge from the vagina or penis
  • Burning pain during urination
  • Testicular pain in men
  • Itching or burning sensations around the vagina in women
  • Bleeding between menstrual periods and after intercourse in women

In addition to the sex organs, chlamydia can infect the rectum which may cause rectal bleeding, pain, and discharge. Bodily fluids carrying the bacteria can also infect the eye, causing conjunctivitis (pink eye).

Symptoms of chlamydia may be so mild that you don’t even notice them. If left untreated, however, chlamydia can lead to serious complications such as:


- Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): PID is an infection of the uterus and fallopian tubes. This can be extremely painful and may damage the reproductive organs.

- Infertility and sterility: A chlamydia infection can damage reproductive organs in both men and women. If left untreated, chlamydia can damage and scar these areas so badly that the infected person is unable to conceive children.

- Newborn infection: The chlamydia bacteria can be passed to a child during delivery, resulting in illness and infection of the child. In some cases, infection to a newborn can be life-threatening.

- Premature birth or ectopic pregnancy: A chlamydia infection increases the risk of giving birth too early, which can be dangerous for the newborn child. Additionally, chlamydia increases the risk of ectopic pregnancy, a condition in which a fertilized egg grows outside the uterus. The egg must be removed to avoid life-threatening complications.

How is a chlamydia/ gonorrhea test performed?

Both chlamydia and gonorrhea tests can be performed by your primary care provider. Women may be asked to avoid douching and vaginal creams for up to 24 hours before a screening appointment.

Women undergoing a gonorrhea test will have a small cell sample taken from their cervix via a cotton swab or brush. This should cause no pain or discomfort. If you do not feel comfortable receiving a gonorrhea test in person, you may be able to perform the test at home with a kit. If this is the case, consult your doctor about what kit to use and how to pass along your sample.

Women undergoing a test for chlamydia will have a cell sample taken from their vagina with a cotton swab or brush.

Men may have a cell sample taken from the opening of the urethra for both gonorrhea and chlamydia tests.

In some cases, for both men and women, a urine sample may be used to detect the presence of these diseases. If your doctor orders a urine test as a screen for STDs, you may be asked to refrain from urinating 1-2 hours before your appointment.

After a urine sample is collected, the vial containing the urine will be given to a lab for testing. Similarly, if a cotton swab or brush was used to collect cell samples, these instruments will be given to the lab for testing.

What do the results of chlamydia/ gonorrhea tests mean?

A positive result from either of these tests indicates that you have been infected with either chlamydia or gonorrhea. A negative test indicates that no infection has been detected.

Chlamydia and gonorrhea tests are routine procedures, and you should receive your results within a few days of your appointment. If you performed the tests at home, the results may take longer. If you have not heard from your health care provider after 3-5 days, you may call the clinic to ask about the status of your test, and whether or not results have been determined yet.

Can I get a chlamydia and gonorrhea test online?

Yes! Online health care marketplaces like Sesame now make it easier than ever to get an STI test. Sesame has partnered with Quest Diagnostics to offer convenient lab tests at affordable cash prices.

Laboratory testing services may vary depending on location. To find a Quest Diagnostics lab near you, type in “chlamydia and gonorrhea test” in our search bar. Once you find the lab nearest to you, you can either schedule an appointment or walk in that same day. The results of your test will be securely and confidentially emailed to you - often in as little as 24 hours.

How are these STDs treated?

Gonorrhea and chlamydia are effectively treated with antibiotic therapy. For most gonorrhea infections, doctors will recommend an injection of ceftriaxone. Chlamydia infections are treated with antibiotic drugs that are usually administered as oral tablets. The infection will usually begin to go away after 7-10 days of antibiotic treatment.

Take your antibiotic treatment as prescribed by your doctor. Even if you are feeling better, continue with the course of medication. Stopping treatment early can cause the infection to recur.

If you have been diagnosed with chlamydia or gonorrhea, abstain from sex while undergoing treatment. Untreated sexually transmitted diseases can lead to serious complications. Additionally, inform any sexual partners you have about the infection so that they can begin treatment too. Even if your partner exhibits no signs or symptoms, it is very likely that they have also been infected, and require treatment. Failure to do so may result in sexual partners trading the infection back and forth repeatedly. Informing your partners will allow them to begin treatment right away.

What are the most common STIs?

While there are a range of sexually transmitted infections, the most prevalent include:

Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that is most often spread through unprotected sex

Gonorrhea: A bacterial infection that can infect the rectum, throat, urethra, and cervix.

Syphilis: A bacterial infection that starts as a painless sore on the mouth, rectum, or genitals, and is spread from contact with these sores via your mucous membrane or skin.

Trichomoniasis: A parasite that can transfer between people during sex.

Genital warts: Caused by certain strains of HPV, and can affect the moist tissues of the genitals.

Hepatitis B (HBV): HBV is a virus that is spread between people through body fluids such as blood and semen. This means it's transmissible through sexual contact and sharing needles.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): HIV is the virus that causes AIDS. The HIV/AIDS virus can break down certain cells of your immune system, leaving you increasingly susceptible to infections and illnesses. HIV/AIDs can be fatal.

Human papillomavirus (HPV): Pelvic inflammatory disease that has the potential to cause cancer in women and men.

Herpes simplex virus: Herpes is a viral infection that can result in sores on your mouth and/or genitals. Herpes of the mouth and genital herpes, though painful or annoying at times, does not usually lead to other serious health problems.

Leaving any of these STIs untreated can cause serious health problems. Book a visit with a healthcare provider through Sesame and save on quality care. Sesame offers virtual doctor's appointments which means you can receive healthcare from the comfort of your home.

What is chlamydia?

Chlamydia trachomatis - commonly known as chlamydia - is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by the bacterium of the same name. Many people do not experience any symptoms of chlamydia.

In addition to the sex organs, chlamydia can infect the rectum which may cause rectal bleeding, pain, and discharge. Bodily fluids carrying the bacteria can also infect the eye, causing conjunctivitis (pink eye).

What complications can chlamydia cause?

Chlamydia infections may vary in severity. Many individuals experience little to no symptoms at all. If left untreated, however, chlamydia can lead to serious complications such as:

- Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): PID is an infection of the uterus and fallopian tubes. This can be extremely painful and may damage the reproductive organs.

- Infertility and sterility: A chlamydia infection can damage reproductive organs in both men and women. If left untreated, chlamydia can damage and scar these areas so badly that the infected person is unable to conceive children.

- Newborn infection: The chlamydia bacteria can be passed to a child during delivery, resulting in illness and infection of the child. In some cases, infection to a newborn can be life-threatening.

- Premature birth or ectopic pregnancy: A chlamydia infection increases the risk of giving birth too early, which can be dangerous for the newborn child. Additionally, chlamydia increases the risk of ectopic pregnancy, a condition in which a fertilized egg grows outside the uterus. The egg must be removed to avoid life-threatening complications.

What is gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by bacteria that affects both men and women. Gonorrhea is spread through unprotected vaginal, oral, and anal sex, or through sharing sex toys that have not been properly cleaned. It cannot be spread through kissing, hugging, or sharing bathroom surfaces.

Gonorrhea is most common among people who have multiple sexual partners and young adults. Nearly half of all gonorrhea diagnoses occur in people between the age of 15 and 24.

What complications can gonorrhea cause?

While early symptoms of gonorrhea are generally mild - sometimes even unnoticeable - if the infection is left untreated, it can lead to serious complications. These include:
- Infertility
- Increased risk of HIV/ AIDS
- Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
- Heart and brain damage
- Joint infection

How can you protect yourself and your partner from STDs?

In order to protect the sexual health of both individuals, sexual partners should get tested before they start having sex. Because STIs can live in a person for years without any symptoms, it's never a bad idea to get tested. Using protection - like condoms, for example - can also reduce the likelihood that you or your partner may contract an STI.

What are STI screening tests?

STI screenings are tests that play a crucial role in detecting sexually transmitted infections and diseases (STIs & STDs). These are not necessarily a routine part of a comprehensive physical exam, so it is important that you ask your primary care provider or gynecologist about receiving testing. Early detection can prevent medical complications for both you and your partner.

It can be awkward to talk about your sex life, but it is important that you are upfront about any symptoms you may be experiencing, your health history, the number of sexual partners you have, and the type of sexual contact you have had recently. All of these details are factors that can help your provider offer accurate STD testing.

Common forms of STD testing include:
- Urine tests
- Cheek swabs/ discharge swabs
- Fluid sampling from sores
- Blood testing
- Physical examination


The specific type of test you need will depend on your symptoms and your health history. If you are diagnosed with an STD, you should tell any sexual partners you have about the diagnosis so that they can be tested and treated - if needed.

How does STI testing work?

There are different types of STI tests depending on your particular case and symptoms. This can be in the form of a blood test, urine test, or swab test, and can be performed at a doctor's office. Through telehealth platforms like Sesame, some doctors may even provide at-home tests. Depending on the test results, your doctor can help develop an STI treatment program that catered to your individual needs.

How often should I get tested for STIs?

If you are experiencing any symptoms related to an STI, or suspect exposure, it is important to get tested. If left untreated, STIs such as gonorrhea can cause a host of issues, including infertility, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), and urethritis. Pregnant women should also note that gonorrhea can cause ectopic pregnancy or can even lead to a miscarriage.

It is also good to note that even if you have received an STD treatment before, you are still at risk for reinfection if you are exposed to a sexual partner that has gonorrhea.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following groups get tested annually:
- Sexually active women under the age of 25
- Women over the age of 25 with multiple sexual partners
- Gay or bisexual men
- Individuals with HIV
- People who have been forced to have sexual activity against their will


Pregnant women should be tested early in the pregnancy because an STI infection can lead to low birth weight, premature labor, or result in a miscarriage. The CDC also recommends that teens and adults ages 13 to 64 get tested for HIV at least once.

Testing varies depending on the type of STI you have. Chlamydia and gonorrhea usually involve a urine or swab test, while other types of STIs including syphilis and genital herpes may require blood tests.

No matter the test, you can save up to 60% on treatment options and healthcare services by booking a visit with Sesame. Sesame offers cash-pay pricing, which means you know what you'll pay before you even step foot in a doctor's office. No hidden fees. No surprise bills. No nonsense.

How do you know if you have a sexually transmitted disease?

Common STD symptoms include itchiness, pain with urination, unusual discharge. Symptoms may also include sores, warts, or rashes in your genital area. If you engage in sexual activity with multiple individuals or have recently changed sex partners, you may want to get tested.
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