Ophthalmologists in Pleasant Hill, MO

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Constantly rubbing and itching your eyes? Struggling to read small print? Tired of getting headaches after reading your computer screen? Ophthalmologists on Sesame help with everything from treating dry eyes to fitting you in the prescription lenses that work for your needs. Your ophthalmologist can keep your eye care vision - and your eye health - 20/20.

An ophthalmologist diagnoses and treats all eye care diseases, performs eye surgery and prescribes and fits eyeglasses and contact lenses to correct vision problems and disorders. Great eye care is part of great healthcare. Healthcare is important, your wellness & preventive care should be your first thought with yearly checkups.

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Frequently Asked Questions
Ophthalmologists

Should I see an optometrist or an ophthalmologist?

Great question! Optometrists and ophthalmologists are both eye doctors who diagnose and treat a wide range of eye conditions and diseases.

Not sure which Doctor is right for your needs? It can be a tricky question - but we've got your back. Here's how they differ:

  • Ophthalmology: Ophthalmologists are medical doctors (MDs) who specialize in eye and vision care. They treat vision problems and eye conditions by offering comprehensive eye exams and fittings for eye glasses and contact lenses. Unlike optometrists, ophthalmologists can perform eye surgery and treat eye diseases.

  • Optometry: An optometrist is an eye health professional who specializes in vision care. Unlike an ophthalmologist, an optometrist is not a medical doctor. Optometrists earn a doctor of optometry degree, or O.D. Optometrists focus on primary eye care for patients dealing with vision loss or changes. They perform routine eye exams, comprehensive eye exams, and eyeglasses/ contact lens fittings, and may prescribe medication to treat eye problems. Optometrists do not perform surgeries or treat eye diseases.

What diseases does an ophthalmologist treat?

Ophthalmologists are medical doctors who specialize in treating a wide range of eye conditions. Ophthalmologists provide comprehensive eye exams to screen for eye disease. Some common conditions that ophthalmologists can treat include:

  • Persistent dry eye syndrome

  • Glaucoma

  • Strabismus (Crossed eyes)

  • Eye infections

  • Astigmatism

  • Macular Degeneration

  • Diabetic retinopathy

  • Presbyopia (age-related farsightedness)

  • Conjunctivitis

To treat these diseases, ophthalmologists may prescribe eye medication or perform eye surgery. Common procedures performed by a specialized eye surgeon include:

  • Refractive surgery (such as LASIK)

  • Cataract surgery

  • Cornea surgery

  • Vitrectomy (retina surgery)

Before you book appointments with an ophthalmologist, check to make sure that they are certified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). This ensures that your eye surgeon has received intensive training and is licensed at the highest-possible level.

Don't wait to get screened for eye diseases and vision problems. Early detection helps reduce issues later on. Connect on Sesame with a licensed ophthalmologist in Pleasant Hill, MO to get the care you need for one affordable, upfront price - no copays or hidden fees. Seeing a doctor for your yearly wellness and prevention checkup can save many other medical issue from arising. Save up to 60% when you book your next comprehensive eye exam through Sesame.

How do I find the best ophthalmologist near me?

Right here!

Sesame makes it easy to find convenient and affordable eye care. Whether you're dealing with an existing eye condition or just want to book a new-patient eye exam, you can connect with a real, quality doctor on Sesame for an upfront, cash price. Save 60% on your next ophthalmologist visit by booking with Sesame. No surprise bills, wait times, or copays. Just clear, quality care.

When should your child have their first eye exam?

The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recommends that children get their first eye exam by the age of six months. Parents should make sure their children receive another exam by the time they turn two. After that, it is recommended that children see an eye doctor every two years.

Eye exams are part of the many tests that doctors perform on babies in the hours after they're born. If your baby is born prematurely or shows signs of eye disease, additional testing may be required.

Eye exams for children are usually performed by a pediatric doctor, but can be done by an eye doctor, depending on your child's health history.

What should I do if I am having vision problems?

If you are having serious vision problems or vision loss, see a doctor right away. Vision loss can be caused by an injury or by more serious conditions, like a stroke. If you are experiencing a severe, acute vision problem, call 911 immediately.

For non-emergency eye care, you can connect today with a licensed doctor on Sesame for a video eye exam. Our real, quality doctors can help diagnose and treat eye conditions for a clear, affordable price. No copays, no insurance networks, no hidden fees. It's really that simple.

What happens at an eye exam?

Eye doctors perform eye exams to help assess the health of your eye and screen for eye conditions. Eye doctors usually conduct two main types of eye exam: routine eye exams and comprehensive eye exams.

Routine eye exams: Routine eye exams are performed annually or every other year. Routine eye exams are meant to check for vision problems and assess your eyesight. Your eye doctor will ask about your medical history, family history (relating to eye conditions), and any eye problems you may be experiencing. The doctor will perform tests to assess general eye health and check for astigmatism, nearsightedness (myopia), or farsightedness (hyperopia)/ age related farsightedness (presbyopia). During a routine eye exam, your doctor will determine whether you may need eye glasses and contact lenses and develop a prescription that works for you. Some tests performed during a routine eye exam include:

  • Visual acuity tests: Tests that determine how well you see the details of a letter or figure at different distances.

  • Visual field test: This test helps doctors determine where the limit of sight is in the corner of your eye.

  • Refraction tests: To determine whether you may need glasses or contact lenses, eye doctors will use a phoropter to test the refractive error of each eye. A phoropter is a medical device that looks like a large pair of goggles. The eye doctor will ask you to look through the phoropter at a series of letters or images and will adjust the phoropter's lenses until arriving at a prescription that works for you.

  • Eye movement tests: These simple tests can often be performed by tracking the eye's movement as it follows an object in the line of sight. This helps doctors check the strength of your ocular muscles.

Comprehensive eye exams: An eye doctor will perform a comprehensive eye exam to asses eye health and visual acuity and screen for eye conditions and diseases. The eye doctor will run a routine eye exam alongside more specific tests tailored to your vision and eye needs. These are usually longer eye exams that are used to check for signs of eye disease or serious eye problems. Tests that may be performed during a comprehensive eye exam include:

  • Tonometry: Tonometry is a test that helps check for glaucoma by measuring eye pressure - the pressure of fluid in the eye.

  • Slit-lamp tests: Slit-lamp (or biomicroscope) tests check for abnormalities in the cornea, iris, and lens of the eye. The doctor will use a special type of light (slit-lamp) and a low-powered microscope to look at the surface of your eye. This painless examination can help catch macular degeneration, detached retinas, and cataracts.

Eye exams play a key role in eye health and general healthcare. Not only do eye exams help doctors assess your quality of vision, they also help determine whether you need eyeglasses or other forms of eye care. Comprehensive eye exams are crucial for catching serious eye conditions.

What are the symptoms of astigmatism?

Astigmatism is a naturally occurring, painless condition. It is caused by an abnormal curvature on the surface of the eye (corneal astigmatism) or in the lens (lenticular astigmatism). In many cases, astigmatism is present with other forms of refractive errors, including:

  • Nearsightedness (myopia): distant objects seem blurry

  • Farsightedness (hyperopia): nearby objects seem blurry

  • Age-related farsightedness (presbyopia): Farsightedness caused by the loss of elasticity in the eye's lens, usually brought on by aging

Astigmatism causes blurry vision, as refracted light creates competing images in the eye. These mismatched images appear foggy or blurry. Your eyes will try to work extra hard to focus on this double vision, which leads to eyestrain and headaches.

Common symptoms of astigmatism include:

  • Blurry vision

  • Distorted/ fuzzy vision

  • Eyestrain

  • Headaches

  • Difficulty seeing at night

  • Squinting

In some cases, you may not experience symptoms of astigmatism at all. If astigmatism goes uncorrected, the strain on your eyes may cause lazy eye (or amblyopia). If you are experiencing any of the symptoms listed above, get in touch with an eye doctor right away. Eye exams are important in helping catch eye conditions like astigmatism before they cause damage to the eye. Your doctor can prescribe corrective lenses or refractive surgery (such as laser surgery) to help correct vision problems you may be experiencing.

What causes nearsightedness?

Nearsightedness is an inherited trait that parents often pass on to their kids. Genetics is the most significant cause of nearsightedness.

Nearsightedness occurs when the corneal surface is too steep (think of an overinflated basketball) or the eyeball is longer than normal. This irregular eye shape causes a refractive error that focuses images in front of the retina - rather than on the retina itself. If nearsightedness goes untreated, it can result in complications down the road, including:

Eyestrain: As your eyes try to focus blurry vision, they may become strained by overexertion. This can cause sore, watery, or light-sensitive eyes.

Eye problems: Nearsightedness that goes untreated, or cases of severe nearsightedness, can cause serious eye health problems such as:

  • Retinal detachment

  • Glaucoma

  • High myopia (nearsightedness that gets progressively worse)

  • Myopic maculopathy (damage to the retina causing vision problems/ vision loss)

Nearsightedness may occur along with astigmatism, a refractive error that causes blurred vision. If you are experiencing persistent vision problems, it is recommended that you talk to an eye doctor (optometrist or ophthalmologist) about vision correction options that might be right for you. Eye health plays a key role in your quality of life, as well as your safety. If nearsightedness goes untreated, it can lead to complications later on in life.

Sesame offers convenient and affordable eye examinations with real, quality doctors Pleasant Hill, MO. Eye doctors on Sesame can assess give you a vision assessment, discuss treatment options, and prescribe corrective lenses if you need them. Save up to 60% on your next eye exam by booking through Sesame.

What is nearsightedness (myopia)?

Myopia (nearsightedness) is an eye condition in which you can clearly see close objects but have trouble focusing on objects far away from you. Nearsightedness occurs when the curvature of the eye causes a refractive error, bending light rays improperly. This focuses visual images on the front of the retina, instead of on the retina itself, causing burry vision.

Nearsightedness is usually genetic. But don't worry! Myopia is not an eye disease and is easily treated with corrective lenses or refractive surgery. Myopia can occur at birth, develop over time, or appear suddenly.

Farsightedness, also called hyperopia, is the opposite. It occurs when the cornea has too little curve, causing nearby objects to appear blurry while leaving far-off objects focused and sharp.

Can farsightedness be corrected?

In most cases, yes! The overwhelming majority of farsighted and nearsighted people experience improved vision with common treatment options such as prescription lenses and refractive surgery.

These common forms of vision correction include:

Corrective lenses:

Eyeglasses: Prescription eyeglasses feature lenses that help compensate for the refractive error in the eye. Lenses are specially shaped properyl bend light into the eye.

Contact lenses: Much like eyeglasses, contact lenses correct refractive errors in the eye. Contact lenses can also be used in orthokeratology, which the American Optometric Association (AOA) described as "braces for your eyes". Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) is a process where rigid contact lenses are worn at night to gently reshape the cornea. This is more commonly used to correct nearsighted vision and astigmatism.

If you want to correct your vision problems without having to wear contact lenses or eyeglasses, you may choose to opt for surgical procedures. Eye surgery is normally done through an ophthalmology clinic after a referral from an optometrist. Eye surgery done to correct refractive errors in the eye is known as refractive surgery.

Refractive surgery procedures:

  • Laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK): LASIK surgery is generally considered a safe and effective form of refractive error correction. In this procedure, a surgeon will use a focused laser beam to create a tiny flap in the cornea, then reshapes the cornea to properly refract light into the eye.

  • Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK): Similarly to LASIK surgery, a surgeon will use a focused laser beam to reshape the curve of the cornea. Instead of cutting a flap in the cornea, though, the surgeon will gently remove the top layer of cells in the cornea to be able to reshape the corneal curve. They will then refit the top layer of cells from the cornea once the shaping is finished. PRK is recommended for people with active lifestyles or jobs. According to the AAO, activity can accidentally dislodge the flap created in the cornea with LASIK. PRK refits the top of the cornea after shaping is finished, so this isn't a concern after the procedure.

What causes farsightedness?

Farsightedness is usually caused by a refractive error in the cornea or an eye that is shorter than normal. Light rays refract through the cornea and the lens to project images onto the retina at the back of the eye. When the cornea is too flat, or if the eye is too short, images will instead be projected behind the retina.

Improper refraction of light causes near vision to be blurry or fuzzy, but distant objects appear with relative clarity.

As the lens of your eye hardens with age, it becomes harder to focus on nearby objects. As the eye loses "elasticity", farsightedness can occur. Age-related farsightedness is a common vision problem for aging adults and is known as presbyopia.

Farsightedness is a common eye problem that can be easily addressed with eye care and prescriptive treatment options. If you have difficulty focusing on nearby objects or experience eyestrain, it is recommended that you speak with an eye doctor (such as an optometrist or ophthalmologist) to schedule a comprehensive eye exam. An eye doctor will discuss your symptoms with you, conduct an eye test/ vision assessment, and may prescribe treatment if it is needed. After an eye examination, farsighted people are usually able to correct their blurred vision with corrective lenses or refractive surgery.

What is farsightedness (hyperopia)?

Farsightedness (hyperopia) is a common eye condition in which you can clearly see distant objects, but nearby objects appear fuzzy. Farsightedness occurs when a lack of curvature in the cornea refracts, or bends, light rays improperly, and results in the blurry vision described above.

Because farsightedness is caused by a flat shape of the cornea or a smaller-than-normal eyeball, it can often run in families. Being farsighted is not an eye disease, and is often easily treated with corrective lenses (such as eyeglasses or contact lenses) or refractive surgery. Hyperopia can occur at birth, or develop over time.

In contrast, nearsightedness (myopia) occurs when the cornea has too much curve, causing close objects to appear in focus, but distant objects appear blurry.

Do I need glasses for farsightedness?

Not all the time. Some mild cases of farsightedness do not require glasses, as the refractive error in the eye isn't enough to cause blurred vision. Some children may experience farsightedness early in life, but as their eyes lengthen, they grow out of the condition.

While most adults do not experience complications from farsightedness, it can cause damage to eye health. Some complications that may arise from farsightedness include:

  • Lazy eye (amblyopia)

  • Crossed eyes (strabismus)

  • Glaucoma

  • Eyestrain

What are the symptoms of dry eyes?

Dry eye syndrome is a common but uncomfortable eye condition that, if unaddressed, can have long term impacts on your eye health. Some common symptoms of dry eyes include:

  • Redness

  • Stinging, or burning feeling in the eye

  • Light sensitivity

  • Watery eyes

  • Blurred vision

  • Stringy mucus in or around the eye

Severe cases of dry eyes can lead to eye infections or eye disease, as the lacrimal glands are unable to create enough lubrication to wash away foreign debris and bacteria in the eye.

What causes dry eyes?

Tears aren't just for when you're feeling down. They are vital in lubricating and cleaning the surface of the eye (also known as the cornea) and washing away foreign debris. Tear production helps maintain a tear film on the cornea, which fights eye infections and improves eye health. Dry eye disease - also sometimes called dry eye syndrome - occurs when the lacrimal glands in the conjunctiva (the membrane inside the eyelid) are unable to produce enough tears to properly lubricate the eye and supply tears. Some specific causes of dry eyes are:

Inadequate tear production: If your tear ducts don't produce enough tears to lubricate the eye and maintain a tear film, your eyes are at risk infection and other serious conditions.

Environmental factors: Dry air or excessive wind can cause increased tear evaporation and reduced tear production.

Aging: People ages 65+ may experience dry eye due to a weakening lacrimal gland. This means that tear production is reduced, and the tear film on the corneal surface is less present. This can lead to eye infections and eye problems.

Medical conditions: Rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disorders, Parkinson's Disease, and diabetes can cause dry eyes. Eye diseases can also cause dryness, such as: blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelid), ocular rosacea (rosacea in the eyes) or Sjogren's Syndrome (an autoimmune disease that results in chronic dry eyes and dry mouth).

Medications: Certain medications, such as antihistamines, decongestants, blood pressure medications (such as diuretics), birth control pills, antidepressants, and acne medication can cause reduced tear production.

Hormonal changes: Hormonal changes during menopause or ingestion of birth control pills can cause women to develop cases of dry eyes.

Computer use: Long term computer use can reduce tear production and lead to dry eyes and blurry vision.

Corneal nerve conditions: Long term use of contact lenses, or loss of nerve sensitivity due to eye surgery/ refractive surgery (such as LASIK, can reduce tear production and cases of dry eyes.

Poor quality of tears: Tears are made up of water, oil, and mucus. Eye conditions such as Meibomian Gland Dysfunction, results from low-quality tears, can cause symptoms of dry eyes.

What diseases does an ophthalmologist treat?

Ophthalmologists are medical doctors who specialize in treating a wide range of eye conditions. Ophthalmologists provide comprehensive eye exams to screen for eye disease. Some common conditions that ophthalmologists can treat include:

  • Persistent dry eye syndrome

  • Glaucoma

  • Strabismus (Crossed eyes)

  • Eye infections

  • Astigmatism

  • Macular Degeneration

  • Diabetic retinopathy

  • Presbyopia (age-related farsightedness)

  • Conjunctivitis

To treat these diseases, ophthalmologists may prescribe eye medication or perform eye surgery. Common procedures performed by a specialized eye surgeon include:

  • Refractive surgery (such as LASIK)

  • Cataract surgery

  • Cornea surgery

  • Vitrectomy (retina surgery)

Before you book appointments with an ophthalmologist, check to make sure that they are certified by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO). This ensures that your eye surgeon has received intensive training and is licensed at the highest-possible level.

Don't wait to get screened for eye diseases and vision problems. Early detection helps reduce issues later on. Connect on Sesame with a licensed ophthalmologist in Pleasant Hill, MO to get the care you need for one affordable, upfront price - no copays or hidden fees. Seeing a doctor for your yearly wellness and prevention checkup can save many other medical issue from arising. Save up to 60% when you book your next comprehensive eye exam through Sesame.

What is Chronic Dry Eye or Dry Eye Syndrome?

Dry eye syndrome is a common condition that occurs when your eyes cannot produce enough tears (tears aren't just for crying, after all, they keep your eyes moist and lubricated). Common symptoms include stinging, burning, or itchy eyes, eye inflammation or redness, light sensitivity, eye fatigue, and blurred vision. Over time, dry eye syndrome can cause discomfort and even eye damage.

Connect with a licensed eye doctor today on Sesame to who can diagnose dry eye syndrome and come up with a treatment plan that works for you--all from the comfort of your home. If necessary, your eye doctor may schedule a follow up appointment or write a prescription. All prescriptions are at the discretion of your doctor.

What is dry eye syndrome and how can I prevent it?

Dry eye syndrome is a condition that occurs when your body does not produce enough tears to sufficiently lubricate your eyes - which can lead to discomfort and even eye infections.

From time to time, it's completely normal for your eyes to feel dry. They could be caused by hormonal changes, aging, or environmental factors like warm weather. There are a number of ways you can reduce your risk of developing dry eyes. It is recommended that you:

  • Avoid blowing air conditioners, hair dryers, or heaters into your eyes. The air and heat produced by these items can lead to increased tear evaporation and dry eyes.

  • Use a humidifier to keep moisture in the air of your home or place of work. This can help keep the surface of the eyes moist.

  • Take nutritional supplements with omega-3 fatty acids. These have been shown to help reduce symptoms of dry eyes.

  • Blink frequently and take eye breaks while working on a computer. Staring at a computer screen for a long time can cause your eyes to dry out. Similarly, if you are concentrating on a task, you may be less likely to blink, which can prevent eyelids from lubricating the eyes with a tear film. Rest your eyes and remember to blink frequently to keep eyes moist while working on a computer.

  • Wear sunglasses outdoors to protect your eyes from wind and dry air. If you deal with chronic dry eyes, it is recommended that you use sunglasses with wrap around frames to fully protect the eye.

  • Don't smoke. Smoking can lead to decreased tear production and dry eye syndrome.

When your dry eyes become chronic, it's time for a doctor to get involved. If left untreated, dry eyes can cause discomfort and even vision problem. Connect with a real, qualified eye doctor on Sesame to get the relief you need for your dry eyes. Eye doctors licensed to treat patients {{inLocationOrNearYou}} can diagnose your condition over video and develop a treatment plan that works for you - all for one affordable, upfront price.

What is the difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist?

Optometrists and ophthalmologists are both eye care professionals. There are some differences between them, though.

Optometrists cover primary care for the eyes. They conduct vision exams and write new prescriptions for eyeglasses and contact lenses. They often assess patients for signs of dry eye syndrome and glaucoma, a condition in which high eye pressure damages the ocular nerve. Optometrists teach patients about eye health and create eye treatment plans. After earning an undergraduate degree, they attend optometry school to obtain an O.D., or Doctor of Optometry.

"So an ophthalmologist is basically the same thing, right?"

Not quite. Ophthalmologists are specialists who treat not just vision problems, but also a range of conditions related to the eye. For example, doctors of ophthalmology conduct eye surgery for conditions like glaucoma or macular degeneration, and they are often the doctors who perform Lasik surgery. They develop comprehensive treatment plans for eye diseases. Instead of earning an O.D. degree, ophthalmologists attend medical school, and then undergo additional training in eye care.

What is the best cure for dry eyes?

If you are experiencing chronic dry eyes, or severe dry eye symptoms, it is recommended that you schedule a consultation with an ophthalmologist at an ophthalmology clinic to discuss treatment plans that might be right for you. Eye doctors use a few different methods to treat dry eyes, including:

Warm compress/ eye masks: Warm compresses applied to the eye lids can help reduce inflammation, stimulate tear production, and ease swelling. Similarly, silicone eye masks worn at night can help hydrate the area around the eyelid and encourage increased tear production.

Antibiotics: Antibiotics can fight infection and ease inflammation in the eyelid and around the eye. Inflammation can prevent glands in the eyelid from secreting oil into tears, which can lead to accelerated tear evaporation. Antibiotics reduce swelling around the eyelid and help promote the tear creation needed to keep eye infections at bay.

Artificial tear solutions: Artificial tear drops can help with lubrication and relieve redness in the eye. Be sure to select an artificial tear solution that is preservative-free, however, as these additives can sometimes irritate your eyes and worsen your symptoms.

Prescription eye drops: Eye drops prescribed by an ophthalmologist or optometrist can help reduce inflammation on the corneal surface. Drugs featuring cyclosporine (such as Restasis) can help control natural tear production, and lessen inflammation.

Supplements: Omega-3 fatty acids can help encourage tear production, and may be recommended by a doctor as a supplement along with other drugs/ treatment options.

Dry eyes can cause infection and serious side effects, such as vision loss, if left untreated. Most cases of dry eyes will go away with eye care treatment, and some medication. If symptoms persist, it is recommended that you speak with a doctor to discuss treatment options and prescription medication that may help.

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