Affordable labs & bloodwork near me in Pearland

Cholesterol, diabetes, thyroid, HIV, testosterone, fertility, and more.
Find the best cash price for labs and bloodwork in Pearland including lipid panel, HbA1c, Complete Blood Count, Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Test, and more.
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2 providers available

Basic health check lab

  • UTS Health Services

    507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
    5
    Laboratory
    • Available tomorrow
    "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

    ArcPoint Labs

    9920 US-90 ALT Suite D160, Sugar Land, TX 77478
    Laboratory
      The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
      • Laboratory tests
      2 providers available

      Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test

      A thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) test is a lab test that evaluates how well your thyroid is working by measuring your thyroid stimulating hormone. Your doctor may recommend a TSH test if you're experiencing symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, including...
      • UTS Health Services

        507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
        5
        Laboratory
        • Available tomorrow
        "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

        Quest Diagnostics

        10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal

        Quest Diagnostics

        4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
        Laboratory
        • Online only deal
        See all Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test
        See all Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test
        The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
        • Laboratory tests
        2 providers available

        Lipid panel (cholesterol)

        Get the best cash price for a lipid panel in Pearland, TX. This group of tests measures cholesterol and other fats in your blood and can be used to help assess your risk of heart disease or stroke. Your doctor...
        • UTS Health Services

          507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
          5
          Laboratory
          • Available tomorrow
          "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

          Quest Diagnostics

          10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal

          Quest Diagnostics

          4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
          Laboratory
          • Online only deal
          See all Lipid panel (cholesterol)
          See all Lipid panel (cholesterol)
          The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
          • Laboratory tests
          2 providers available

          Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP)

          Comprehensive Metabolic Panels (CMPs) measures 14 different substances in your blood to give your doctor important information about your body's chemical balance and metabolism. CMPs measure the levels of albumin, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, carbon dioxide, chloride, creatinine, glucose, potassium,...
          • UTS Health Services

            507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
            5
            Laboratory
            • Available tomorrow
            "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

            Quest Diagnostics

            10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal

            Quest Diagnostics

            4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
            Laboratory
            • Online only deal
            See all Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP)
            See all Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP)
            The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
            • Laboratory tests
            5 providers available

            HIV lab test

            Know your status with this fourth generation HIV antigen/antibody tests that screen for both HIV-1 antigen and HIV-1/2 antibodies. This test helps doctors detect both acute and chronic phases of HIV and is currently recommended by the CDC.
            • Kimberly Barrow, FNP-BC

              7501 Fannin Street Suite 705, Houston, TX 77054
              Family medicine
              • Available today
              "Dr. Barrow is amazing! She listens"

              John Davis, PA

              930 FM 1960 Rd. E. Suite E, Houston, TX 77073
              Emergency medicine
              • Available today
              • $5 MEDS
              "Mr Davis (PA) was very patient with my concerns and was very thorough in explaining his treatment plan and what to expect."

              UTS Health Services

              507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
              5
              Laboratory
              • Available tomorrow
              "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

              Quinten Robertson, DNP

              20750 Cypresswood Dr, Humble, TX 77338
              Family medicine
              • Available tomorrow
              • $5 MEDS
              "Quinten was very understanding. He helped me get the medicine that I needed. "

              Quest Diagnostics

              10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
              Laboratory
              • Online only deal

              Quest Diagnostics

              10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
              Laboratory
              • Online only deal

              Quest Diagnostics

              11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
              Laboratory
              • Online only deal

              Quest Diagnostics

              11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
              Laboratory
              • Online only deal

              Quest Diagnostics

              1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
              Laboratory
              • Online only deal

              Quest Diagnostics

              355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
              Laboratory
              • Online only deal
              See all HIV lab test
              See all HIV lab test
              The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
              • Laboratory tests
              • Test results interpretation
              • Advice on appropriate next steps
              2 providers available

              Comprehensive annual panel

              A Comprehensive Annual Panel (CMP) includes up to 14 tests that help doctors get a broad overview of your health, including blood count, a metabolic panel to evaluate kidney and liver function, as well as heart health and critical information...
              • UTS Health Services

                507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
                5
                Laboratory
                • Available tomorrow
                "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

                Quest Diagnostics

                10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal

                Quest Diagnostics

                4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
                Laboratory
                • Online only deal
                See all Comprehensive annual panel
                See all Comprehensive annual panel
                The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
                • Laboratory tests
                2 providers available

                Hemoglobin A1c lab test

                Hemoglobin A1c Lab Tests, also called A1c, HbA1c, or glycated hemoglobin, is generally used by doctors to check for diabetes or prediabetes in adults. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, an HbA1c can help you and your...
                • UTS Health Services

                  507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
                  5
                  Laboratory
                  • Available tomorrow
                  "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal

                  Quest Diagnostics

                  4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
                  Laboratory
                  • Online only deal
                  See all Hemoglobin A1c lab test
                  See all Hemoglobin A1c lab test
                  The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
                  • Laboratory tests
                  2 providers available

                  Complete blood count (CBC)

                  Complete Blood Count (CBC) is a common blood test used by doctors to screen for a variety of conditions including anemia, malnutrition, infections, inflammation, leukemia and other conditions.

                  A CBC evaluates your overall health by measuring several components of your

                  ...
                  • UTS Health Services

                    507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
                    5
                    Laboratory
                    • Available tomorrow
                    "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal

                    Quest Diagnostics

                    4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
                    Laboratory
                    • Online only deal
                    See all Complete blood count (CBC)
                    See all Complete blood count (CBC)
                    The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
                    • Laboratory tests
                    2 providers available

                    Standard health panel

                    Standard health panel of tests including a Complete Blood Count (CBC) Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP); Urinary Analysis (UA); Hemoglobin A1c; and Lipid Panel.
                    • UTS Health Services

                      507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
                      5
                      Laboratory
                      • Available tomorrow
                      "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal

                      Quest Diagnostics

                      4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
                      Laboratory
                      • Online only deal
                      See all Standard health panel
                      See all Standard health panel
                      The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
                      • Laboratory tests
                      2 providers available

                      Testosterone lab test

                      A Testosterone Lab Test measures the levels of testosterone in your blood and can help your doctor assess whether you have high or low levels of testosterone in your blood. This test can be used to screen for several conditions...
                      • UTS Health Services

                        507 North Sam Houston Parkway East Suite 165, Houston, TX 77060
                        5
                        Laboratory
                        • Available tomorrow
                        "Everything was great. Quick and easy!!"

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        10228 W Broadway, Pearland, TX 77505
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        10907 Memorial Hermann Dr Ste 120, Pearland, TX 77584
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        11717 Highland Meadow Dr, Houston, TX 77059
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        11914 Astoria Blvd Ste 110, Houston, TX 77065
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        1505 E Winding Way Dr Ste 178, Friendswood, TX 77433
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        355-A East Parkwood, Friendswood, TX 77546
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        7400 Fannin Street Suite 180, Houston, TX 77030
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        7580 Fannin Suite 233, Houston, TX 77054
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal

                        Quest Diagnostics

                        4904 Fairmont Pkwy Building 1, Pasadena, TX 77630
                        Laboratory
                        • Online only deal
                        See all Testosterone lab test
                        See all Testosterone lab test
                        The following inclusions and exclusions apply:
                        • Laboratory tests
                        FAQs

                        Labs

                        Can I get lab work done through Sesame?

                        Yes, Sesame offers lab work at Quest and other lab locations across the country. To confirm availability in your area, you can search for labs and update the search bar to your local area.

                        What should I do if I need lab work?

                        National lab chains will still accept standard lab orders via fax or online portal. Please confirm with the lab regarding scheduling for in-person collection. COVID-19 lab orders are generally not being collected at Quest and LabCorp locations.

                        What tests are included in a standard health panel?

                        A standard health panel is a routine blood/ urine test that uses various types of analysis to determine your overall health, and diagnose any infections or diseases that may be detected. The most common tests performed during a standard health panel include:

                        - Complete blood count

                        - Comprehensive metabolic panel

                        - Lipid panel

                        - Thyroid panel

                        - Blood clot tests

                        - Urinalysis

                        What are these tests used for?

                        More on the tests included in a standard health panel:

                        Complete blood count (CBC):

                        A complete blood count (CBC) is a common blood test that evaluates your overall health by measuring several components of your blood, including:
                        - Red blood cells
                        - White blood cells
                        - Hemoglobin
                        - Platelets


                        Abnormalities in these blood levels may indicate the presence of an underlying health condition such as:
                        - Anemia
                        - Bone disorders
                        - Malnutrition (such as vitamin or mineral deficiencies)
                        - Infections
                        - Inflammation
                        - Autoimmune disorders
                        - Leukemia and lymphoma
                        - Sickle cell anemia


                        Comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP):

                        A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) measures 14 different substances in your blood to give your doctor important information about your body's chemical balance and metabolism.

                        CMPs measure the levels of:
                        - Albumin
                        - Blood urea nitrogen
                        - Calcium
                        - Carbon dioxide
                        - Chloride
                        - Creatinine
                        - Glucose
                        - Potassium
                        - Sodium
                        - Total bilirubin
                        - Total protein
                        - Liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase)


                        A test of these levels can help doctors check several body systems such as:
                        - Liver and kidney function
                        - Blood sugar levels
                        - Blood protein levels
                        - Acidity in the blood
                        - Electrolyte balance
                        - Metabolism


                        CMPs check the same substance balances as a BMP, as well as levels of enzymes that are made by the liver (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase). Levels of bilirubin - a waste product made by the liver - are also tested to determine how well your body is filtering red blood cells. High levels of bilirubin may indicate liver or bile duct problems (such as cancer or gallstones).

                        Comprehensive metabolic panels are especially important for individuals who are managing a chronic health condition (such as diabetes), or who routinely take prescription medication that may affect the function of the liver and kidneys.

                        Lipid Panel:

                        A lipid panel is a group of tests that measures cholesterol and other fats in your blood. These results can then be used to help assess your risk of heart disease or stroke. Your doctor may recommend a lipid panel if you have a family history of heart disease or stroke - or if you have any conditions that may increase your risk of heart diseases, such as high blood pressure, obesity, high total cholesterol, and more.

                        Lipids are fat molecules in the blood. They act as energy stores and chemical messengers in the body. A lipid panel measures levels of 3 different lipids, as well as your total cholesterol levels:


                        - Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol: Commonly known as “bad cholesterol”, LDL will build up and clog the arteries. Excess levels of LDL cause plaque in blood vessels, which can obstruct and slow blood flow. If this plaque build-up occurs in the blood vessels around the heart, it can lead to coronary artery disease.

                        - High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol: Known as “good cholesterol”, HDL carries cholesterol through the body and deposits it back into the liver, which removes these fatty molecules from the body.

                        - Triglycerides: When you eat, your body converts any unneeded calories into triglycerides - a molecule that is stored in fat cells. In between meals, these molecules are converted into energy. Eating more calories than you burn can result in a build-up of triglycerides, which can lead to heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.

                        Lipid panel testing is especially important for individuals who have risk factors of heart disease and coronary artery disease.

                        Risk factors include:
                        - Family history of heart disease or high cholesterol
                        - Being overweight/ obese
                        - Cigarette smoking
                        - Lack of physical activity/ cardiovascular conditions
                        - High blood pressure
                        - Diabetes
                        - Unhealthy diet
                        - History of high cholesterol


                        Thyroid Panel:

                        Thyroid panel tests are used to determine the levels of T3 and T4 hormones in your blood. Low amounts of these hormones indicate an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), where excessive levels of T3 and T4 indicate an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

                        A comprehensive thyroid panel will evaluate your thyroid function with 3 different tests:

                        - TSH test: A thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test is a lab test that evaluates how well your thyroid is working by measuring your thyroid-stimulating hormone. Your doctor may recommend a TSH test if you're experiencing symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, including anxiety, weight gain/loss, tiredness, hair loss, irregular menstrual periods, changes in your heart rate, puffiness, and more.

                        - T4 Test: A thyroxine (T4) test measures the level of T4 in the blood.
                        - T3 Test: A triiodothyronine (T3) test measures the level of T3 in the blood.

                        Blood Clot Tests:

                        Also known as a coagulation panel, this test measures protein levels in the blood that affect clotting.

                        Blood clotting helps stop bleeding when you get a wound, but may also lead to blockage in an artery or vein. This can cause a stroke, heart failure, or heart attack. Your doctor may order a coagulation panel if they suspect you may have a condition that affects your body’s normal blood clotting functions.

                        Conditions that may be diagnosed through a coagulation panel test include:
                        - Hemophilia (a bleeding disorder that may result in spontaneous bleeding)
                        - Thrombosis (blood clots causing a blockage in blood vessels)
                        - Liver disease
                        - Vitamin K deficiency


                        If you are currently taking blood-thinning medication, your doctor may schedule regular blood clot tests to reduce your risk of spontaneous or uncontrollable bleeding.

                        Urinalysis:

                        Commonly known as a urine test, this exam employs a microscope visual examination, as well as a dipstick test to identify possible infections in the urinary tract. Dipstick tests, specifically, check the chemical balance of urine to measure levels of:

                        - Acidity: Excessive acidity (ph) levels in the urine may indicate a kidney or urinary tract disorder.

                        - Protein: Large amounts of protein in the urine may indicate a kidney disorder, as the kidneys are responsible for filtering these substances out of the urine.

                        - Glucose: Elevated sugar levels in the urine are usually an indication of prediabetes or diabetes.

                        - White blood cells: White blood cells in the urine are a common indicator of infection.

                        - Bilirubin: Bilirubin is a waste product from the breakdown of red blood cells in the liver. The presence of this substance in urine may indicate a liver disorder.

                        If a microscope exam is performed, your urine will be checked for the presence of:

                        - White blood cells: White blood cells in the urine are usually an indicator of infection.

                        - Red blood cells: Red blood cells in the urine are a common sign of a kidney disorder, bladder cancer, or an infection of the urinary tract.

                        - Pathogens: Bacteria, viruses, parasites, or yeast in the urine may indicate the presence of an infection in the urinary tract, kidneys, or liver.

                        - Crystals: Uric crystals are a common indicator of kidney stones.

                        How do I prepare for a standard health panel?

                        Most blood testing requires little to no preparation. Some tests, such as the comprehensive metabolic panel or the lipid panel require you to fast for 8-12 hours before your appointment. Talk to your health care provider about the proper preparation for your test.

                        What happens during a standard health panel?

                        Most blood tests are performed at a primary care office, often as a part of a routine yearly check-up.

                        During your appointment, your arm will be wrapped in a band to push blood into the veins of the arm. This makes it easier to insert the needle that will be drawing blood from that area. You may feel a slight pinch as the needle is inserted into your arm, but this sensation should pass within a few seconds. The needle draws blood from a vein in your arm, depositing it into a vial or test tube. Some individuals or tests may require multiple tubes to be filled.

                        After the needed about of blood has been drawn, the needle will be taken out of your arm and the puncture site will be cleaned and bandaged. The blood will then be sent to a lab for testing and analysis.

                        If your doctor has ordered urinalysis, you will be asked to deposit a predetermined amount of urine into a small vial for testing. You will be asked to go to the bathroom, where you begin urinating into the toilet. After a second, fill the vial with the ordered amount of urine, then finish urinating into the toilet. You will then give this vial to your primary care provider, who will send it to the lab for testing.

                        You will get your results for most tests in 1-3 business days. A complete metabolic panel may take longer, due to the amount of testing needed. Depending on the results of your blood test, your health care provider may request follow-up testing to provide a definitive diagnosis of any health conditions or diseases they may detect.

                        What is a complete blood count?

                        A complete blood count (CBC) is a common blood test used by doctors to screen for a variety of conditions including:
                        - Anemia
                        - Bone disorders
                        - Malnutrition (such as vitamin or mineral deficiencies)
                        - Infections
                        - Inflammation
                        - Autoimmune disorders
                        - Leukemia and lymphoma
                        - Sickle cell anemia


                        A CBC evaluates your overall health by measuring several components of your blood, including:
                        - Red blood cells
                        - White blood cells
                        - Hemoglobin
                        - Platelets


                        Abnormalities in these blood levels may indicate the presence of an underlying health condition. In some cases, your provider may adjust any medication you may be taking in light of the results of your CBC.

                        Unlike other labs and blood tests, CBCs do not require fasting before your appointment.

                        What are normal ranges for a CBC?

                        Normal, healthy ranges of a blood cell count for adults over the age of 15 are:

                        Red blood cell count

                        Men: 4.7 to 6.1 million cells per microliter (mcL)
                        Women who aren’t pregnant: 4.2 to 5.4 million mcL

                        Hemoglobin (The protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen)

                        Men: 13.0 - 17.0 g/dL (grams per deciliter)
                        Women: 11.5 - 15.5 g/dL (grams per deciliter)

                        Hematocrit (Concentration of red blood cells)

                        Men: 40 - 55%
                        Women: 36 - 48%

                        White blood cell count

                        3,400 to 9,600 cells/mcL

                        Platelet count

                        Men: 135,000 to 317,000/mcL
                        Women: 157,000 to 371,000/mcL


                        If your results show numbers outside this range, you may be asked to come back to your health care provider’s office for follow-up testing. A CBC is not a definitive test, meaning it is not the sole method doctors use in diagnosing medical conditions. In some cases, numbers just outside the “normal” range of healthy blood counts in otherwise healthy individuals may not be a cause for concern. Similarly, individuals undergoing cancer treatment or pregnant women may produce blood count numbers outside these ranges. In these cases, a doctor may adjust treatment or medication to balance blood levels.

                        What is a comprehensive metabolic panel?

                        A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) measures 14 different substances in your blood to give your doctor important information about your body's chemical balance and metabolism.

                        CMPs measure the levels of:
                        - Albumin
                        - Blood urea nitrogen
                        - Calcium
                        - Carbon dioxide
                        - Chloride
                        - Creatinine
                        - Glucose
                        - Potassium
                        - Sodium
                        - Total bilirubin
                        - Total protein
                        - Liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase)


                        A test of these levels can help doctors check several body systems such as:
                        - Liver and kidney function
                        - Blood sugar levels
                        - Blood protein levels
                        - Acidity in the blood
                        - Electrolyte balance
                        - Metabolism

                        What happens during a comprehensive metabolic panel?

                        You may be asked to fast (no eating or drinking of any kind) for 8-12 hours before your appointment.

                        During your appointment, a health care provider will draw your blood via a needle inserted into a vein in your arm. This may cause a little sting, but is safe and harmless. A small amount of blood is taken from your arm and deposited in a test tube. This tube is then sent to a lab for testing and analysis. The punctured area where the needle was inserted will be cleaned and bandaged to prevent infection.

                        Comprehensive metabolic panels require no anesthesia, so you will be cleared to resume your daily activities after your appointment. Because you may be required to fast for up to 12 hours prior to undergoing a CMP, it is recommended that you schedule your appointment right away in the morning.

                        It usually takes several business days for you to get your results back. If your doctor detects any abnormalities or patterns in your results that may indicate an underlying health condition, you may be contacted to schedule follow-up testing.

                        Why do I need to get a CMP?

                        Comprehensive metabolic panels are usually done during your routine yearly check-up. Just as other parts of the check-up test your blood pressure, eye and skin health, and other crucial health factors, a CMP gives doctors a clearer sense of your internal - and overall - health.

                        Comprehensive metabolic panels are especially important for individuals who are managing a chronic health condition (such as diabetes), or who routinely take prescription medication that may affect the function of the liver and kidneys.

                        What is a comprehensive female panel?

                        A comprehensive female lab panel is a series of blood tests used to check the hormone levels and overall health of a woman. The specific types of tests that are conducted during this panel vary depending on the clinic or at-home testing brand that you elect to use.

                        What is a comprehensive male panel?

                        A comprehensive male lab panel is a series of blood tests used to check the hormone levels and overall health of a man. The specific types of tests that are conducted during this panel vary depending on the clinic or at-home testing brand that you elect to use.

                        What is the difference between a comprehensive and basic metabolic panel?

                        Basic metabolic panel testing checks the blood levels of:
                        - Blood urea nitrogen
                        - Calcium
                        - Carbon dioxide
                        - Chloride
                        - Creatinine
                        - Glucose
                        - Potassium
                        - Sodium


                        BMPs are primarily used to check electrolyte and blood sugar levels, and your body’s acid-base balance.

                        CMPs check the levels of these substances, as well as enzymes that are made by the liver (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase). Levels of bilirubin - a waste product made by the liver - are also tested to determine how well your body is filtering red blood cells. High levels of bilirubin may indicate liver or bile duct problems (such as cancer or gallstones).

                        Your doctor may order a CMP or BMP based on your health history and needs.

                        What tests are included in a comprehensive female panel?

                        Specific tests included in a comprehensive female panel may vary depending on the brand of test you receive, but common forms of testing include:

                        Complete blood count (CBC): A complete blood count (CBC) is a common blood test that evaluates your overall health by measuring several components of your blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets. This can help doctors diagnose infections, autoimmune disorders, anemia, and other health conditions.

                        Lipid Panel: A lipid panel is a group of tests that measures cholesterol and other fats in your blood. These results can then be used to help assess your risk of heart disease or stroke. Your doctor may recommend a lipid panel if you have a family history of heart disease or stroke - or if you have any conditions that may increase your risk of heart diseases, such as high blood pressure, obesity, high total cholesterol, and more.

                        Thyroid Panel: Thyroid panel tests are used to determine the levels of T3 and T4 hormones in your blood. Low amounts of these hormones indicate an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), where excessive levels of T3 and T4 indicate an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

                        Thyroid-stimulating hormone test: A thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test is a blood test used to measure levels of TSH in the blood. This helps doctors determine how well the thyroid gland is working. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that lies below your Adam’s apple in the front of the neck. The gland is responsible for the production of the triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) hormones, which regulate your body’s metabolism. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland in the brain and acts as a stimulant for the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormone levels are too low, TSH will be produced by the pituitary gland to provoke hormone production from the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormone levels are high, your pituitary gland should produce less TSH.

                        Comprehensive Metabolic Panel: A comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) measures 14 different substances in your blood to give your doctor important information about your body's chemical balance and metabolism.

                        CMPs measure the levels of:
                        - Albumin
                        - Blood urea nitrogen
                        - Calcium
                        - Carbon dioxide
                        - Chloride
                        - Creatinine
                        - Glucose
                        - Potassium
                        - Sodium
                        - Total bilirubin
                        - Total protein
                        - Liver enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase)


                        A test of these levels can help doctors check several body systems such as:
                        - Liver and kidney function
                        - Blood sugar levels
                        - Blood protein levels
                        - Acidity in the blood
                        - Electrolyte balance
                        - Metabolism


                        Progesterone: Progesterone is a steroid hormone that is released from the ovaries to help regulate estrogen, the menstrual cycle, and the early stages of pregnancy. An imbalance of progesterone and estrogen can lead to weight gain, fibroids, increased cancer risks, ovarian cysts, and bone loss (osteoporosis).

                        Estradiol: Estradiol helps regulate the menstrual cycle, as well as maintain the health of the female reproductive system.

                        Hemoglobin A1c Lab Test: Also called A1c, HbA1c, or glycated hemoglobin, this test measures the average amount of blood sugar (also called glucose) attached to your hemoglobin over the past three months. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body. An HbA1c test is generally used by doctors to check for diabetes or prediabetes in adults.

                        Total testosterone: This test measures the levels of testosterone in the blood. Testosterone helps regulate body fat, muscle mass, bone mass, red blood cell count, sperm count, and libido. Excessive levels of testosterone can lead to an increase in cholesterol, hardened blood cells, and increased body hair. Low levels of testosterone can affect reproductive health, fertility, and other natural functions (such as strength, energy, and fat storage).

                        DHEA-S: DHEA is produced in the adrenal glands to promote the production of testosterone and estrogen. DHEA levels decrease with age but are commonly supplemented during hormone replacement therapy to counteract the symptoms of low testosterone or low estrogen (depending on whether you are a man or woman).

                        Vitamin D Test: A vitamin D 25-hydroxy test is a simple blood test used by doctors to measure vitamin D levels in the blood. According to the National Institutes of Health, roughly 41% of American adults have vitamin D deficiency. This can lead to bone and muscle pain, increased risk of infection, and fatigue. Additionally, vitamin D plays a crucial role in protecting the body from conditions such as:
                        - Cancer
                        - Type 2 diabetes
                        - Heart disease
                        - Depression
                        - Bone loss


                        Your doctor may recommend a vitamin D 25-hydroxy test if you are at risk of vitamin D deficiency.

                        People at risk of a vitamin D deficiency include:
                        - Older adults
                        - Individuals with dark skin
                        - Individuals who do not receive much sun exposure
                        - Individuals managing obesity
                        - Individuals with osteoporosis, celiac disease, and Crohn’s disease
                        - Individuals who have had gastric bypass surgery

                        Why do I need a comprehensive female panel?

                        Comprehensive female panels are used to check levels of hormones and certain substances in your blood. These tests can help diagnose low hormone levels in older women, as well as health conditions like thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and prediabetes (if glucose is tested).

                        These panels can also help individuals monitor their hormone levels while undergoing hormone replacement therapy. Excessive levels of sex hormones can produce adverse effects. Checking these levels can help you and your doctor keep these hormones balanced.

                        Imbalance hormone levels can lead to symptoms such as:
                        - Heavy or irregular periods
                        - Weight gain
                        - Osteoporosis (weak or brittle bones)
                        - Hot flashes
                        - Breast tenderness
                        - Acne
                        - Constipation or diarrhea
                        - Uterine bleeding
                        - Infertility
                        - Excessive body/ facial hair growth
                        - Deepening of the voice
                        - Thinning hair or hair loss


                        If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor about a comprehensive female hormone panel. The earlier you can detect hormone imbalances, the earlier you can begin hormone replacement therapy. This may prevent symptoms from worsening.

                        What happens during a comprehensive female panel?

                        Most blood tests are performed at a primary care office, often as a part of a routine check-up. Talk to your doctor if you would like to perform a female lab panel at home. There are several brands that provide these tests for home use, so ask your doctor for a recommendation of a test that’s right for you.

                        If you are undergoing a lab panel in a primary care clinic, your blood will be drawn for testing. During your appointment, your arm will be wrapped in a band to push blood into the veins of the arm. This makes it easier to insert the needle that will be drawing blood from that area. You may feel a slight pinch as the needle is inserted into your arm, but this sensation should pass within a few seconds. The needle draws blood from a vein in your arm, depositing it into a vial or test tube. Some individuals or tests may require multiple tubes to be filled.

                        After the needed about of blood has been drawn, the needle will be taken out of your arm and the puncture site will be cleaned and bandaged. The blood will then be sent to a lab for testing and analysis.

                        You will get your results for most tests in 1-3 business days. A comprehensive female panel may take longer, due to the amount of testing needed. Depending on the results of your blood test, your health care provider may request follow-up testing to provide a definitive diagnosis of any health conditions or diseases they may detect.

                        What tests are included in a comprehensive male panel?

                        Specific tests performed for a comprehensive male panel may vary depending on the brand of test or clinic, but common forms of testing include:

                        Total testosterone: This test measures the levels of testosterone in the blood. Testosterone helps regulate body fat, muscle mass, bone mass, red blood cell count, sperm count, and libido. Excessive levels of testosterone can lead to an increase in cholesterol, hardened blood cells, and prostate problems. Low levels of testosterone can affect reproductive health, fertility, and other natural functions (such as strength, energy, and fat storage).

                        Dihydrotestosterone: Commonly known as DHT, this hormone is commonly converted from testosterone as a man ages. Excessive levels of DHT may indicate an enlarged prostate (known as benign prostate hyperplasia).

                        Estrone & estradiol: Commonly known as “female” hormones, excessive levels of estrone and estradiol can lead to obesity, breast enlargement, and prostate problems.

                        DHEA-S: DHEA is produced in the adrenal glands to promote the production of testosterone and estrogen. DHEA levels decrease with age but are commonly supplemented during hormone replacement therapy to counteract the symptoms of low testosterone or low estrogen (depending on whether you are a man or woman).

                        PSA: Prostate-specific antigens are proteins created by the prostate gland. Elevated levels of PSAs in the blood can indicate a prostate condition (such as benign prostate hyperplasia) or prostate cancer.

                        Complete blood count (CBC): A complete blood count (CBC) is a common blood test that evaluates your overall health by measuring several components of your blood, including red blood cells, white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets. This can help doctors diagnose infections, autoimmune disorders, anemia, and other health conditions.

                        Lipid Panel: A lipid panel is a group of tests that measures cholesterol and other fats in your blood. These results can then be used to help assess your risk of heart disease or stroke. Your doctor may recommend a lipid panel if you have a family history of heart disease or stroke - or if you have any conditions that may increase your risk of heart diseases, such as high blood pressure, obesity, high total cholesterol, and more.

                        Thyroid Panel: Thyroid panel tests are used to determine the levels of T3 and T4 hormones in your blood. Low amounts of these hormones indicate an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), where excessive levels of T3 and T4 indicate an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

                        Vitamin D: A vitamin D 25-hydroxy test is a simple blood test used by doctors to measure vitamin D levels in the blood. According to the National Institutes of Health, roughly 41% of American adults have vitamin D deficiency. This can lead to bone and muscle pain, increased risk of infection, and fatigue.

                        Why do I need a comprehensive male panel?

                        Comprehensive male panels are used to check levels of hormones and certain substances in your blood. These tests can help diagnose low hormone levels in older men, as well as health conditions like thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and prediabetes (if glucose is tested).

                        These panels can also help individuals monitor their hormone levels while undergoing hormone replacement therapy. Excessive levels of testosterone and estrogen can produce adverse effects. Checking these levels can help you and your doctor keep these hormones balanced. Imbalance hormone levels can lead to symptoms such as:
                        - Decreased sex drive - Male pattern baldness - Erectile dysfunction - Decreased muscle mass - Decreased strength - Fatigue - Increased blood pressure/ risk of heart disease - Increased body fat - Obesity - Bone loss/ osteoporosis - Mood changes (such as depression or irritability)


                        If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor about a comprehensive male hormone panel. The earlier you can detect hormone imbalances, the earlier you can begin hormone replacement therapy. This can prevent symptoms from worsening.

                        What happens during a comprehensive male panel?

                        Most blood tests are performed at a primary care office, often as a part of a routine check-up. Talk to your doctor if you would like to perform a male lab panel at home. There are a number of brands that provide these tests for home use, so ask your doctor for a recommendation of a test that’s right for you.

                        If you are undergoing a lab panel in a primary care clinic, your blood will be drawn for testing. During your appointment, your arm will be wrapped in a band to push blood into the veins of the arm. This makes it easier to insert the needle that will be drawing blood from that area. You may feel a slight pinch as the needle is inserted into your arm, but this sensation should pass within a few seconds. The needle draws blood from a vein in your arm, depositing it into a vial or test tube. Some individuals or tests may require multiple tubes to be filled.

                        After the needed about of blood has been drawn, the needle will be taken out of your arm and the puncture site will be cleaned and bandaged. The blood will then be sent to a lab for testing and analysis.

                        You will get your results for most tests in 1-3 business days. A comprehensive male panel may take longer, due to the amount of testing needed. Depending on the results of your blood test, your health care provider may request follow-up testing to provide a definitive diagnosis of any health conditions or diseases they may detect.

                        What is a testosterone lab test?

                        A testosterone level test helps determine the amount of testosterone a male’s body is naturally producing. If an individual is undergoing hormone replacement therapy, this test can also help monitor hormone levels to track the efficacy of hormone supplementation.

                        Testosterone is a male sex hormone that is crucial to development, especially during puberty. Low testosterone - also known as male hypogonadism - occurs when the testes do not produce enough testosterone, resulting in a hormone deficiency. Low testosterone causes different symptoms, depending on the person and their age.

                        Low testosterone may be present at birth or develop over years. Genetically male fetuses may experience underdeveloped genitals as a result of low testosterone. Young males with low testosterone may experience delayed puberty or underdevelopment during puberty unless the condition is treated.

                        Age is a common cause of low testosterone. After the age of 30, a man’s body begins to produce less testosterone. Over time, this leads to a gradual reduction in testosterone levels. Nearly 40% of men over the age of 45 experience low testosterone levels.

                        Aside from natural aging, other causes of low testosterone include:
                        - Injury to the testicles
                        - Chemotherapy
                        - Pituitary disorders such as a pituitary tumor
                        - Klinefelter syndrome (a condition in which a man is born with an extra X chromosome)
                        - Kallman’s syndrome (the abnormal development of the hypothalamus gland, which regulates hormone production)
                        - Hemochromatosis (too much iron in the blood)
                        - Liver failure
                        - Kidney failure
                        - Inflammatory conditions such as sarcoidosis or tuberculosis
                        - HIV/AIDS
                        - Medications such as opioid pain medication or hormone replacement drugs
                        - Anabolic steroid use
                        - Obesity
                        - Alcohol abuse

                        What blood tests are performed during a thyroid panel?

                        A comprehensive thyroid panel will evaluate your thyroid function with 3 different tests:

                        - TSH test: A thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test is a lab test that evaluates how well your thyroid is working by measuring your thyroid-stimulating hormone. Your doctor may recommend a TSH test if you're experiencing symptoms of hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, including anxiety, weight gain/loss, tiredness, hair loss, irregular menstrual periods, changes in your heart rate, puffiness, and more.

                        - T4 Test: A thyroxine (T4) test measures the level of T4 in the blood.

                        - T3 Test: A triiodothyronine (T3) test measures the level of T3 in the blood.

                        Other blood tests that may be performed during a thyroid panel include:

                        - Thyroid antibody test: This test measures levels of thyroid antibodies that are produced to determine whether or not the immune system is mistakenly creating antibodies to attack the thyroid gland. By doing this, thyroid antibody tests can help detect underlying autoimmune causes of hyper/hypothyroidism such as Grave’s disease or Hashimoto’s disease.

                        - Thyroglobulin: This test measures the thyroglobulin protein, which is produced by the thyroid gland or thyroid cancer cells. A thyroglobulin test can help detect inflammation of the thyroid gland- especially in patients who have had their thyroid gland removed due to thyroid cancer.

                        What is a TSH test?

                        A thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test is a blood test used to measure levels of TSH in the blood. This helps doctors determine how well the thyroid gland is working. The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that lies below your Adam’s apple in the front of the neck. The gland is responsible for the production of the triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) hormones, which regulate your body’s metabolism. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland in the brain and acts as a stimulant for the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormone levels are too low, TSH will be produced by the pituitary gland to provoke hormone production from the thyroid gland. If thyroid hormone levels are high, your pituitary gland should produce less TSH.

                        Why would I need a TSH test?

                        Levels of TSH in the blood can help doctors determine the function of the thyroid gland. High levels of TSH might mean an underactive thyroid, whereas low levels of TSH may indicate an overactive thyroid. This test helps doctors detect and diagnose possible thyroid disorders such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.

                        What happens during a TSH test?

                        A blood sample is taken to measure TSH levels. To do this, your doctor will insert a small needle into a vein in your forearm. Before the needle is put into your skin, the area will be sanitized. You may feel a pinch as the needle punctures your skin, but this discomfort should subside within a few seconds.

                        Blood drawn from your arm is deposited in a small vial or tube. Once the desired amount of blood is taken from the arm, the puncture site will be cleaned and bandaged. The vial will be given to the lab for analysis.

                        TSH tests are quick and do not require sedation. You will be cleared to leave the clinic and resume your daily activities once the testing is finished.

                        You should receive the results of your TSH test within 1-3 days of your appointment. Your primary care provider will inform you of the results of the analysis. Depending on the findings, you may be asked to come back to the clinic for follow-up testing to definitively diagnose any thyroid conditions. Thyroid cancer, for instance, requires a biopsy or diagnostic imaging test (such as a CT or X-ray scan) before treatment can begin.

                        The results of a TSH test do not necessarily indicate a hormone condition. TSH levels correspond to levels of T3 and T4 in the blood. Because of this, you will likely be asked to undergo further testing before you are diagnosed with a thyroid condition. TSH tests are commonly performed in tandem with other thyroid tests as a part of a comprehensive thyroid panel. These tests measure various determinants of thyroid function, such as T3 and T4 levels. Comprehensive thyroid panels are commonly performed for individuals at risk of a thyroid condition, or for individuals taking medication that affects thyroid function - such as lithium.

                        How do I prepare for a TSH test?

                        TSH tests require no specific preparation. If your health care provider has ordered other blood tests to be performed along with a TSH test, you may need to fast for 8-12 hours before your appointment. If this is not the case, then there is nothing you need to do to prepare for a TSH test.

                        What is an iron test?

                        An iron blood test checks the level of iron in your blood. Iron is a mineral that is absorbed into the body through foods such as spinach, red meats, fortified cereals, or seafood. Iron helps your body make red blood cells which carry oxygen from your lungs to the rest of the body. Iron also helps maintain muscle, bone marrow health, and organ function.

                        Several tests measure iron levels in the blood:

                        - Serum iron test: This test measures the amount of iron in the blood.

                        - Serum ferritin: This test measures how much iron is stored in the body. When blood iron levels are low, your body will pull from these stores of the mineral as supplementation.

                        - Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC): A TIBC test measures the levels of free transferrin present in the blood. Transferrin is a protein that carries iron through the blood. Transferrin free from iron may indicate low iron levels.

                        - Transferrin test: A transferrin test measures transferrin levels in the blood.

                        Your doctor may recommend or order an iron test if they suspect that you have an excessive or deficient level of the mineral in your blood. This can help diagnose conditions such as iron overload (excess iron) or anemia (low red blood cell counts caused by chronic iron deficiency).

                        Who needs an iron test?

                        An iron test may be ordered if your doctor suspects that you have excessive or deficient levels of iron in your blood.

                        Symptoms of low iron levels include:
                        - Fatigue
                        - Dizziness
                        - Pale skin
                        - Weakness
                        - Headaches
                        - Rapid heartbeat


                        Symptoms of excessive iron levels include:
                        - Joint pain
                        - Fatigue
                        - Abdominal pain
                        - Weight loss
                        - Weakness


                        An iron blood test may be used to monitor the efficacy of iron supplementation. In other cases, an iron test can be used to diagnose iron conditions such as iron overload (excessive iron levels) or anemia (low red blood cell counts caused by an iron deficiency).

                        Excessive iron is commonly caused by iron supplementation alongside an already iron-rich diet (high in red meats, leafy greens, and seafood). Liver disease, lead poisoning, or hemochromatosis may also cause excess levels of iron in the blood. Low iron levels may be caused by a lack of iron in the diet, difficulty absorbing the minerals, blood loss, or pregnancy.

                        What do the results of an iron test mean?

                        Iron tests are used to diagnose high or low levels of iron in the blood. An imbalance of mineral levels may be caused by supplementation, diet, or conditions such as pregnancy. Abnormal iron levels may also be caused by health conditions that require treatment.

                        Low levels of iron in the blood may be caused by conditions such as:

                        - Anemia: Anemia is defined as a low red blood cell count. Anemia makes it difficult for red blood cells to carry oxygen from the lungs to various parts of the body, resulting in fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and a rapid heart rate.

                        - Thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited condition that involves low levels of hemoglobin - a substance that helps red blood cells carry oxygen. Thalassemia may cause anemia and may result in symptoms such as slowed growth, fatigue, dizziness, and weakness.

                        Excessive levels of iron in the blood may be caused by conditions such as:

                        - Dangerous iron supplementation: Taking too much iron can lead to toxic side effects that cause abdominal pain, joint pain, fatigue, and weakness.

                        - Hemochromatosis: A inherited disorder that causes your body to absorb too much iron from the food you eat. Excessive levels of iron may cause liver disease, heart problems, and diabetes.

                        Talk to your doctor about treatment options if you are diagnosed with mineral imbalances. Do not start taking iron supplements, or discontinuing the use of prescribed supplements, until you are instructed to do so by your doctor.

                        What is a GGT test?

                        A gamma-glutamyl transferase test measures the levels of the GGT enzyme in the blood. GGT is found in organs and tissues throughout the body but is most common in the liver. While experts do not have a definitive explanation for the role GGT plays in the body, high levels of the enzyme may indicate liver and bile duct-related disorders.

                        GGT tests are rarely performed to diagnose a liver condition. Rather, if you are exhibiting signs of liver problems, your doctor may order a GGT test as a preliminary screen for conditions such as:
                        - Liver cancer
                        - Viral hepatitis: an infection of the liver that causes inflammation and organ damage
                        - Biliary obstruction: A blockage of the bile ducts - the tubes that carry bile from the liver
                        - Bone disease
                        - Excessive alcohol use
                        - Pancreas problems (such as pancreatitis)

                        Is follow-up testing needed?

                        Individuals who have been previously diagnosed with a liver condition, or who are dealing with chronic HBV, may require follow-up liver function testing to ensure that these conditions are not damaging the liver. Your doctor may order a gamma-glutamyl transferase test to detect levels of GGT in the blood, a common indicator of liver function.

                        What is a lipid panel?

                        A lipid panel is a group of tests that measures cholesterol and other fats in your blood. These results can then be used to help assess your risk of heart disease or stroke. Your doctor may recommend a lipid panel if you have a family history of heart disease or stroke - or if you have any conditions that may increase your risk of heart diseases, such as high blood pressure, obesity, high total cholesterol, and more.

                        A lipid panel test is performed by taking a sample of blood via a finger prick. This blood is sent to a lab to measure lipid levels in the blood.

                        The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) recommends that adult men should receive a lipid panel test every 1-2 years between the ages of 45-65. Women should be tested every 1-2 years between the ages of 55-65. Adults over the age of 65 should receive a lipid panel test every year.

                        Children usually receive a lipid panel test once between the ages of 9-11 and every five years after that.

                        More frequent testing may be recommended if you are at risk of coronary artery disease.

                        Common risk factors include:
                        - Family history of heart disease or high cholesterol - Being overweight/ obese - Cigarette smoking - Lack of physical activity/ Cardiovascular conditions - High blood pressure - Diabetes - Unhealthy diet - History of high cholesterol


                        If you experience one or more of the risk factors listed above, talk to your health care provider about how often you should undergo lipid testing. The test is quick and relatively painless and plays a crucial role in detecting heart and arterial diseases.

                        What do my results mean?

                        Your provider will discuss the results of your lipid panel with you but for reference, see below:

                        Total Cholesterol - lower is better:

                        • Below 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered healthy.
                        • 200 to 239 mg/dL is borderline high.
                        • 240 mg/dL is high.

                        HDL (Good Cholesterol) - higher is better:

                        • 60 mg/dL or higher is best -- High HDL levels protect against heart disease.
                        • 40 to 59 mg/dL is a healthy level of HDL.
                        • Less than 40 mg/dL is low, which can increase risk of heart disease.

                        LDL ("bad cholesterol") - lower is better:

                        • Less than 100 mg/dL is ideal, especially for individuals who have coronary heart disease.
                        • 100 to 129 mg/dL is optimal for individuals at risk of coronary artery disease.
                        • 130 to 159 mg/dL is OK for individuals with little risk of coronary artery disease
                        • 160 to 189 mg/dL is high.
                        • 190 mg/dL or more is very high

                        Triglycerides - lower is better:

                        • 150 mg/dL or less is desirable.
                        • 151 to 200 mg/dL is borderline high
                        • 200 to 499 mg/dl is high, which increases your risk of heart disease
                        • Over 500 mg/dl is very high.

                        What is a hemoglobin A1c lab test?

                        Hemoglobin A1c Lab Tests, also called A1c, HbA1c, or glycated hemoglobin is a test that measures the average amount of blood sugar (also called glucose) attached to your hemoglobin over the past three months. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body. Doctors generally recommend getting an HbA1c every three months if you are managing a chronic condition like diabetes. That's because three months is the average lifespan of a red blood cell.

                        An HbA1c test is generally used by doctors to check for diabetes or prediabetes in adults. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes, an HbA1c can help you and your doctor evaluate and manage your condition.

                        What does an HbA1c test screen for?

                        Diagnostic HbA1c tests are used to determine blood sugar levels - the critical factor in diabetes diagnosis. The results of an A1c test are given as percentages. These correspond to your blood sugar levels.

                        - Below 5.7%: A1c levels that are below 5.7% indicate healthy blood sugar levels. This means you are not currently at risk of developing diabetes.

                        - Between 5.7-6.4%: This range indicates prediabetes, a serious health condition. Prediabetes requires immediate treatment to manage blood sugar levels and prevent the development of Type 2 diabetes.

                        - 6.5% or higher (after 2 separate tests): Blood sugar levels higher than 6.5% indicate that you have developed diabetes. Doctors will order two separate A1c tests to conclusively test dangerous blood sugar levels. If both tests come back with blood sugar levels at over 6.5%, they will begin treating you for diabetes.

                        For individuals already managing diabetes, doctors will aim to keep blood sugar levels under 7%. Blood sugar levels over 7% may require an adjustment in your treatment plan.

                        What is an HIV lab test?

                        HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a viral infection that damages your body’s immune system. HIV is transmitted through sexual contact or contact with infected blood. Pregnant women may pass this disease to their unborn child, or through breastfeeding. HIV is the early stage of the infection that may progress to become AIDS. If left untreated, HIV usually develops into AIDS within 8-10 months - once the virus has severely damaged the immune system.

                        HIV/ AIDS dramatically affects your body’s ability to fight infection. Individuals managing AIDS may become fatally ill from a disease that causes mild symptoms in healthy individuals.

                        Deaths caused by HIV/ AIDS have decreased in the last 10-20 years, however, the disease is still deadly if left untreated. Early detection can help you and your doctor slow the progression of the illness through medication.

                        No HIV test can detect HIV immediately after exposure. The tests used to diagnose HIV are usually employed within 10-90 days after infection. If you believe you may have been exposed to HIV in the last 72 hours, contact your doctor to schedule a post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) appointment. PEP involves taking medication for 28 days after possible exposure to prevent HIV.

                        You may elect to undergo PEP if:
                        - You had unprotected sex with someone who may be infected, or if the condom broke during sex
                        - If you have shared needles, syringes, or injection equipment (most common in narcotic drug users)
                        - You have been sexually assaulted


                        If you are worried that you may have been exposed to HIV, talk to your doctor about scheduling a test to diagnose the disease. Specific instructions for timing and preparation will be given depending on your symptoms, and the timing of your exposure.

                        What is urinalysis?

                        Urinalysis is a broad term used to describe urine testing.

                        This form of testing is used to detect and diagnose conditions such as:
                        - Urinary tract infections
                        - Diabetes
                        - Kidney disease


                        Urine tests may be used to diagnose medical conditions such as those listed above, as well as check your overall health, and monitor any existing conditions you may have been diagnosed with. These tests are commonly performed during a routine check-up, before surgery, or during pregnancy. They help doctors screen for and diagnose conditions that may not be apparent during a physical examination.

                        Why are urine tests done?

                        Urine tests are usually performed for three reasons. These are detailed below:

                        - Diagnosis: Urinalysis may be requested if you are experiencing pain or difficulty during urination, back pain, or abdominal pain. This helps doctors diagnose conditions such as kidney disease, liver disease, urinary tract infections, and diabetes.

                        - Check-up: Urinalysis is commonly part of a standard health panel performed at a routine check-up. Doctors will test your urine for various enzymes and substances that may indicate your overall health, as well as internal organ function. Pregnant women are commonly ordered to submit urine tests to check the health of the pregnancy.

                        - Monitoring: If you have been diagnosed with a kidney or liver disease, diabetes, or a urinary tract infection, urinalysis may be ordered to monitor the efficacy of your treatment. This can also help doctors check how the disease is progressing over time.