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DERMATOLOGIST
For patients in Blackland, MS that need to see a dermatologist
Birth Control
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OBGYN
See a doctor, nurse, or OBGYN in Blackland, MS.
VAGINAL DISCHARGE
Treatment for patients in with vaginal problems in Blackland, MS
VAGINAL INFECTIONS
Treatment for patients in Blackland, MS with a yeast infection
WEIGHT LOSS
Get help with weight management in Blackland, MS.
NUTRITIONIST
See a nutritionist in Blackland, MS.
PODIATRIST
See a podiatrist in Blackland, MS.
SEXUAL HEALTH
STI / STD consulting, birth control options, ED consults, vasectomy consultations and telehealth OB-GYN visits
FAQs

Women's Health

How can I get birth control?

Birth control describes a wide range of contraceptive methods used to prevent unplanned pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs/ STDs). When someone says "birth control", they often mean hormonal birth control pills, but it's helpful to know that this term describes a larger set of options. Some other types of birth control methods include:
- Condoms
- Vaginal rings (like NuvaRing)
- IUDs (intrauterine devices such as Paragard)
- Birth control shot (Depo-Provera)


Not sure which birth control option is right for you? Good news! Sesame offers convenient reproductive health services including:
- Birth control consultations
- Birth control prescriptions
- Women's health services
- IUD removal
- Specialist referrals


Birth control subscriptions are commonly available through primary care providers or women's health centers (like OB/GYN clinics). Don't let your insurance plan tell you which doctor you have to see. Pick a provider you want to see and book your appointment on your schedule. It's that simple.

Health care providers on Sesame offer both in-person and telehealth family planning services at clear and affordable prices. Whether you need a new prescription or a refill of an existing prescription, you can save up to 60% when you book birth control services through Sesame- no health insurance needed.

Is there a difference between OB/GYN and gynecology?

While OB/GYN, practiced by obstetrician-gynecologists, is generally considered to be a single specialty, it is made up of two distinct fields: obstetrics and gynecology. Obstetrics (the OB of OB/GYN) deals with the care during pre-conception, pregnancy, childbirth, and post-delivery, while gynecology (the GYN or OB/GYN) deals with the care of all women's health issues. So while obstetrics deals specifically with prenatal care, pregnancy, high-risk pregnancies, and other medical needs of pregnant women (or women soon to become pregnant), gynecology deals with women's health and wellness more generally.

What is the difference between an obstetrician and a gynecologist?

Obstetricians and gynecologists are very similar - but there are some differences between the two.

Obstetrics:

Obstetrics deals specifically with all aspects of pregnancy, including prenatal and postnatal care. Obstetricians are responsible for delivering babies and treating pregnancy-related issues, such as fetal distress and ectopic pregnancies (the fetus grows outside of the uterus). Obstetricians, along with endocrinologists, can also provide therapy to help with fertility and pregnancy issues.

Gynecology:

Gynecologists specialize in the female reproductive system and treat a broad array of women's health conditions.

Gynecologists help women with reproductive issues from their first period through menopause. Gynecologists will also perform a number of regular tests and exams, such as:
- Pap smear (to screen for cervical cancer)
- Breast exams (screening for breast cancer)
- Pelvic exams (screening for ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids, STIs, and cancer)


Gynecologists can also be consulted for:
- Contraceptive/ birth control counseling
- Endometriosis treatment
- Abnormal/ irregular menstruation
- Polyps in the reproductive system (usually in the cervix or vagina)
- Infection (such as UTIs or STIs)


Most doctors will undergo training to specialize in both obstetrics and gynecology. This allows the provider to offer more complete and comprehensive care to patients. Providers who specialize in both obstetrics and gynecology are known as OB/GYNs.

What is a gynecologist?

Gynecologists are doctors who specialize in women’s health and the female reproductive system, which includes the vagina, uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes. Most gynecologists are also doctors of obstetrics (practices associated with childbirth, pregnancy, and postpartum care), which is why gynecologists are often called OB/GYNs. Gynecologists can treat issues related to menstruation, fertility, STIs, menopause, and hormones.

How do I find an OB/GYN near me?

Right here! Sesame offers convenient, affordable OB/GYN visits in cities across the country! Simply type "gynecologist" or "OB/GYN" in our search bar to find a real, quality women's health care provider near you. From infections to discomfort, doctors on Sesame can help diagnose and treat gynecological conditions for women of all ages.

Have questions or concerns about your reproductive health? Book a consult on Sesame with a licensed OB/GYN to discuss any health concerns you may have.

Save 60% on your next OB/GYN visit when you book with Sesame.

When should I see an OB/GYN?

Gynecological visits can help address concerns you may have about your reproductive system. Some conditions or concerns an OB/GYN can help with are:
- Questions or concerns about the female reproductive system, including breasts, uterus, vulva, ovaries, and urological symptoms.
- Issues or concerns regarding fertility, pregnancy, menstrual health, and contraception.
- Issues regarding incontinence.
- Questions about sexual health, libido, and sexually transmitted diseases.
- Concerns about urinary tract infections (UTIs), and yeast infections.


Connect with a real, licensed gynecologist near you to get your questions answered and conditions addressed - all for one affordable, cash price. Sesame works directly with doctors - not insurance companies - to get you the care you need without surprise bills or confusing copays.

When should I see an OB/GYN over video?

Video appointments offer you a convenient, affordable way to get care without leaving the house. Video OB/GYN consults can help address several questions and concerns about women’s health, and the health of the female reproductive system, including:
- Questions or concerns about the female reproductive system, including breasts, uterus, vulva, ovaries, and urological symptoms.
- Issues or concerns regarding fertility, pregnancy, menstrual health, and contraception.
- Issues regarding urinary incontinence.
- Questions about sexual health, libido, and sexually transmitted diseases.
- Concerns about urinary tract infections (UTIs), and yeast infections.


Note that in some cases, your doctor may recommend in-person follow-up care, if appropriate.

What questions should I ask an OB/GYN?

Seeing an obstetrician-gynecologist (OB/GYN) is your opportunity to get any questions or concerns you have about your reproductive health answered and addressed.

If you have any health concerns, or just want more information, it's a good idea to go to your appointment with a list of questions you may want to ask. Specific questions may vary depending on your age, sexual activity, and health history. Some common questions are:
- Do I need any vaccinations?
- Am I at high risk for any developing cancers or infections?
- How do I reduce the risk of breast cancer or cervical cancer?
- How often should I get cancer screenings and breast exams?
- How heavy should my menstrual flow be?
- What should I expect while going through menopause?
- What type of contraception is best for me?
- How often should I get tested for an STI?


Some women feel more comfortable seeing a female gynecologist. When you book a visit on Sesame, you get to pick the doctor you want to see - not the one your insurance company makes you see.

At what age should a woman start seeing an OB/GYN?

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that girls first see an OB/GYN between the ages of 13-15. Many issues and concerns before the age of 13 can be handled by a primary care physician. The first visit with an OB/GYN may just be a talk about development. There may be personal questions about puberty, menstrual periods, and sexual activity. Most girls will not need a Pap smear or pelvic exam on their first visit unless they are experiencing abnormal pain or bleeding.

What services can OB/GYNs provide?

OB/GYNs have special training to be able to diagnose and treat conditions related to women's health and the female reproductive system. Visits to an OB/GYN clinic play a key role in maintaining your health and wellness and in staying one step ahead of chronic conditions. Some common health services provided by an OB/GYN include:
- Pap smears
- Pelvic exams
- Breast exams/ breast cancer screening
- STI tests
- Ultrasounds
- Fertility/ Contraceptive counseling


If you are dealing with a health concern or medical condition, an OB/GYN has the training to perform a number of surgeries and procedures such as:
- Removal of cysts on ovaries (ovarian cysts)
- Uterine fibroid removal
- Cesarean sections
- Hysterectomy
- Reconstructive surgery
- Endometriosis therapy


Depending on your health history or health concerns, an OB/GYN may provide a referral for a specialist such as an endocrinologist or a doctor of urogynecology.

Save up to 60% when you book your OB/GYN visit through Sesame.

Can I see an OB/GYN over video?

Yep! Doctors on Sesame can diagnose, treat, manage, and screen for a variety of questions and conditions related to women's health. Common things addressed over video with patients include contraceptives and birth control, menopause, questions regarding prenatal conditions or pregnancy, urinary incontinence, UTIs and other vaginal infections, and more. While some services generally cannot be performed over video, like cancer screenings, Sesame offers in-person visits in select cities for any conditions you may not be able to address over video.

Is it safe to see an OB/GYN during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Video OB/GYN consults are a safe and convenient way to see the doctor if you're concerned about COVID-19 in a doctor's office.

Note that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has released guidelines and FAQ resources regarding gynecological practices during the novel Coronavirus pandemic. If you are not experiencing an urgent condition, your routine in-person check-up appointment may be addressed over video with a qualified doctor on Sesame.

In the event of an urgent medical need, your doctor may suggest in-person follow-up, especially if you are suffering from any of the following conditions:
- A chronic or extremely painful vaginal infection
- Recurring pain in the pelvic organs
- Abnormal or severe vaginal bleeding
- Concerns regarding pregnancy or the viability of a pregnancy

How much does an OB/GYN visit cost?

An OB/GYN appointment can often cost up to $300 with insurance.

Save 60% on your next OB/GYN appointment when you book with Sesame. On Sesame, you can connect directly with real, qualified gynecologists in Blackland, MS who can treat a wide range of women's health conditions for one affordable, upfront price. No copays. No surprise bills. Just the care you need.

Can OB/GYNs help with fertility issues?

Yes! Reproductive endocrinologists (REs) are OB/GYNs who specialize in diagnosing and treating issues related to infertility, pregnancy issues, and hormone functions. Women or couples see REs for a number of reasons, including:
- Inability to conceive after a full year of trying
- Medical history of infertility or pregnancy loss
- Irregular or absent menstrual cycles
- Attempting to conceive when a woman is over the age of 35
- Medical history of reproductive conditions like endometriosis, fibroids, or gynecological cancer
- Trying to conceive with a medical history of sexually transmitted infections such as HIV/AIDS, and human papillomavirus (HPV); or complications from STDs like pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)


REs may conduct additional tests to assess reproductive health, including:
- Cervical mucus exams
- Hormone testing, including luteinizing hormone (LH tests)
- Blood tests to screen for human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis, and HIV/ AIDS
- Uterine and fallopian tube X-rays


In some cases, reproductive endocrinologists can help with assisted reproductive techniques like in vitro fertilization and reproductive counseling.

Connect with a doctor on Sesame today to learn which options are right for you. {{numberOfResults}} real, qualified gynecologists are available for consults in Blackland, MS today.

Can an OB/GYN perform a hysterectomy?

It depends. Some gynecologists are trained to perform hysterectomies, surgeries that remove the uterus. Gynecological oncologists also perform these procedures.

Your gynecologist may recommend a hysterectomy to treat:
- Endometriosis (abnormal tissue cells growing outside the uterus, causing menstrual and pelvic pain)
- Cancers of the reproductive organs (cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, and ovarian cancer)
- Fibroids (tumors in the uterus)
- Uterine prolapse (when the uterus drops or slides into the vagina)


If you are experiencing any of these conditions or have any questions about whether or not you may need a hysterectomy, book a visit with a real, licensed gynecologist on Sesame. Our providers can help you decide what treatment is right for you for a simple, upfront price.

What are pelvic exams and Pap smears?

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that women begin getting pelvic exams and Pap smears, also called a Pap test, at age of 21. However, some doctors may recommend an alternative approach. As always, consult with your doctor first to determine if and when a pelvic exam is right for you.

Generally, a pelvic exam involves an examination of the vulva; an examination of the vagina and cervix; and an internal exam to check for abnormalities, as well as the size and position of the uterus and ovaries

Pap smears are used to screen for cervical cancer, usually done at the same time as a pelvic exam and/or HPV test. If needed, a Pap smear is performed by collecting cells from the cervix with a small brush.

The ACOG recommends that women receive a Pap smear every 3 years starting at the age of 21. These are preventative tests that are used to catch cancers, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and cysts. In the event of any abnormalities or concerns, you may be referred to an oncologist or follow-up specialist to diagnose a condition.

Why is it important to regularly schedule a Pap smear test?

It is generally recommended that women get a Pap smear test every three years, starting at the age of 21. Women above the age of 30 may choose to get Pap smears every five years, but you should consult with a gynecologist to determine a time interval that suits your needs.

Pap smears detect changes or abnormalities in cervical cells, which are strong indicators of cervical cancer. Routine Pap smear tests can help catch cervical cancer early when it can more easily be treated. Like routine breast exams, consider regular Pap smears as a key part of cancer prevention.

What is a pelvic ultrasound?

Pelvic ultrasound sonography is a medical imaging technique that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the pelvic organs and lower abdomen. Ultrasound images help doctors see what's going on inside the body without having to use surgery. During a pelvic ultrasound, sound waves bounce off organs, tissue, and blood vessels and into a transducer that reads and interprets the waves. This procedure creates real-time images that can help doctors address conditions related to pelvic pain, reproductive organ health, and the wellness of a fertilized egg in utero (a baby growing during pregnancy).

There is more than just one type of pelvic ultrasound. The type of pelvic ultrasound your doctor orders depends on your sex, health history, and symptoms. Additional types of pelvic ultrasounds include:

Transvaginal/ endovaginal ultrasound (sonohysterography)

During a transvaginal ultrasound, the sonographer will insert a small transducer into the vagina while you lie on an exam table with your feet in stirrups. These scans are often done in an obstetrics-gynecology clinic (OB/GYN) by a certified sonographer. The transducer will emit sound waves which will create real-time images of the reproductive and pelvic organs, including the fallopian tubes, endometrium, ovaries, cervix, and vagina. Transvaginal ultrasounds can be used to address conditions such as:
- Infertility
- Ovarian cysts
- Abnormal vaginal bleeding
- Uterine fibroids
- Pelvic inflammatory disease (inflammation in the reproductive organs)
- Intrauterine device (IUD) displacement


Pregnant women may receive a transvaginal ultrasound to check the health of the uterus. This can be used to detect abnormalities in the uterus or diagnose conditions such as ectopic pregnancy.

Transrectal ultrasound

Transrectal ultrasounds are similar to transvaginal ultrasounds, but the transducer is inserted into the rectum instead of the vagina. Transrectal ultrasounds are commonly performed for men who are at risk of prostate cancer but may also help radiologists detect other medical conditions related to the bladder, prostate glands, and seminal vesicles. Transrectal ultrasounds may cause a mild amount of discomfort as the small transducer is inserted into the rectum, but the scan should only take about 30 minutes.

Transabdominal ultrasound

During a transabdominal ultrasound, a hand-held transducer is placed upon the lower abdomen to create images of the bladder, kidneys, liver, pancreas, and intestines. Transabdominal ultrasounds are used to detect abnormal growths (like tumors or cysts), aortic aneurysms, and masses (like an abscess). A special Doppler ultrasound may be used to test blood flow through blood vessels in the abdominal organs.

Pelvic ultrasounds can help doctors detect a wide range of health conditions inside the pelvis and lower abdomen. They are quick, only mildly uncomfortable, and do not use radiation. They can show real-time images of organs, soft tissue, and blood vessels in the body. The specialized Doppler ultrasound can be used to show blood flow by pinging sound waves off moving blood cells. In some cases, however, further testing may be needed. A doctor may order a biopsy, for example, if they suspect a growth inside the body may be cancerous.

Looking to book an imaging exam? Sesame offers convenient pelvic ultrasounds in Blackland, MS at affordable cash prices. Save up to 60% on an ultrasound appointment when you book through Sesame- no insurance needed.

When should I go to the doctor for a vaginal infection?

If left untreated, certain types of vaginal infections can cause more issues down the road. Trichomoniasis, for example, can cause urinary tract infections and can put you at a higher risk for developing cervical cancer, especially if you are also infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

The bottom line: if you have concerns regarding your vaginal infection, you should see a healthcare provider such as a gynecologist to get the care - and peace of mind - that you need.

What are the symptoms of a vaginal infection?

Symptoms of vaginitis can include irregular vaginal discharge (thick, grayish-white, greenish-yellow, and/or cottage cheese-like), vaginal itching, vaginal soreness, or an especially fishy vaginal odor.

It is important to see a doctor if you experience any of these symptoms, especially if they are accompanied by a fever, pelvic pain, or chills. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can prevent vaginitis from dissipating on its own accord. Connect directly with a gynecologist through Sesame and save up to 60% on healthcare services. Whether it's symptoms related to vaginitis or regular check-ups, Sesame clears your way to quality care.

How do you get a vaginal infection?

There are many causes of vaginitis. Some common causes include:

Vaginal yeast infection (vaginal candidiasis): There are many reasons why you can get an overgrowth of Candida albicans, including high levels of estrogen, poor diet, antibiotics, and diabetes.

STDs: Different types of sexually transmitted diseases can cause vaginitis, including gonorrhea, chlamydia, gonorrhea, herpes, and trichomoniasis.

Bacterial overgrowth: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a condition that involves the overgrowth of bacteria in the vagina. New sex partners and douching are a few examples of how an imbalance of bacteria can occur in the vagina.

Foreign objects: Things like forgotten tampons, or tissue paper can irritate the tissues of the vagina.

Vaginitis is treatable based on its cause. While antibiotics treat BV, they may not treat vaginitis caused by a fungal infection. Speaking to a doctor about your symptoms can help reveal a diagnosis and treatment plan that's specific to your case. Sesame offers telehealth visits up to 60% off what you'd pay through an insurance carrier. Book a virtual consult with a gynecologist through Sesame and get ready to save.

How do I get a lactation consultation?

There are a few options when picking a healthcare professional that can help you with a lactation consult. These include:

Lactation Consultants/Breastfeeding Counselors: Trained healthcare workers that help new parents prepare for milk production and teach proper breastfeeding techniques.

Postpartum: A person who provides non-medical support in the days and weeks after having a baby, that includes physical, and emotional care.

LaLeche League (LLL): LLL is a nonprofit organization that provides educators, advocators, and trainers concerning breastfeeding, and may provide free or discounted WIC services.

What is the difference between a lactation consultant and a lactation counselor?

Lactation counselors (CLCs) are often seen as a stepping stone to becoming an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC). To receive this title, you must first pass an exam from an accredited program such as the International Lactation Consultant Association (ILCA)or the International Board of Lactation Consultant Examiners (IBLCE).

An IBCLC must have at least 90 hours of education specific to lactation, at least 300 and 1000 hours of clinical experience (depending on the program), and take required courses through a lactation program or nursing school.

Both a CLC and an IBCLC are healthcare professionals that can provide breastfeeding support and education, provide referrals for diagnosis and treatment of medical issues related to breastfeeding, explain common symptoms related to breastfeeding issues, and assist in the use of breast pump supplies. And in both cases, you may receive hospital in-patient lactation services, outpatient lactation consult, or private practice care depending on the service you choose.

How do lactation consultants work?

A certified lactation consultant can assess and provide advice in regards to common and more serious breastfeeding challenges. They may offer support by sharing information on how to increase milk supply, offer advice on breastfeeding pain management, and/or help you find a nursing position that delivers the best results.

From before your baby is born through the weaning process, your lactation consult may include a plan for you that includes breastfeeding goals and breastfeeding outcomes. Some women find breastfeeding challenging and may feel overwhelmed or defeated. A lactation consultant may also provide you resources such as support groups for breastfeeding parents to help work through the stresses of new parenthood. They are also qualified to assess common and serious nursing problems that include:

- Clogged milk ducts: When your milk duct gets blocked or has poor drainage, your milk duct can become clogged. This can feel like a lump in your breast can be painful and swollen. If left untended your clog can turn into mastitis.

- Mastitis: Inflamed breast tissue that is sometimes accompanied by infection. This type of inflammation can be painful, cause swelling, warmth, and redness to occur, and may even bring on fever and chills.

- Engorgement: A swelling of the breast that occurs when you have an increased blood flow and milk supply that often happens in the first days after you give birth.

- Low milk supply: If your baby isn't getting enough milk, this can be caused by an array of reasons including latching issues, starting to breastfeed too late, not breastfeeding often enough, medication, and supplementing breast-feeding.

- Sore nipples: Though it is common to have tender nipples within the first few weeks of breastfeeding, it shouldn't hurt. A lactation consultant may help you work through this issue.

What are risk factors for breast cancer?

Several different factors could put you at a higher risk of breast cancer. According to the CDC, you may be more likely to develop breast cancer if the following apply to you:

- Personal and family history: If anyone in your immediate family has had breast cancer, then you may be at higher risk and should consider regular mammography visits.

- Dense breasts: There is more connective tissue in dense breasts, increasing the likelihood that you could develop breast cancer.

- Gene mutations: Genetic mutations in genes such as the BRCA1 and BRCA2 may put you at a higher risk of breast cancer.

- Aging: Most cases of breast cancer involve women above the age of 50.

- Previous radiation therapy: Women who have previously received radiation therapy in the chest before the age of 30 have a higher risk of developing breast cancer later down the line.

What are the types of breast exams you can get?

Health care providers use breast exams and mammograms to detect cancer in breast tissue before symptoms occur. There are a few ways in which you can get tested:

Mammogram: A screening mammogram is a low-dose x-ray that takes two or more x-rays of each breast to check for tumors and abnormalities.

Breast ultrasound: If abnormalities are found during your mammogram, your doctor may request a breast ultrasound, which uses sound waves to see the breast tissue in real-time. A breast ultrasound is a useful option for women with dense breasts.

Breast tomosynthesis (3-D mammography): Uses x-rays and computer technology to create a 3-D image of the breast. 3-D mammography is another useful option for women with dense breasts.

Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM): Combines 3-D mammography with a contrast dye to better detect breast cancer in those who are high-risk or who have dense breasts.

Breast MRI: Uses radio waves and magnets, along with a computer to create a detailed image of your breast. This is a great option for those who have previously had breast cancer and would like to avoid the radiation from a regular mammogram.

Self-exam: This is an at-home exam where you check your breasts for any unusual lumps or thickening of the skin. Learn how to perform a self-exam here.

What are the benefits of mammography?

Early detection is crucial in catching breast cancer and starting treatment before it spreads. Studies show that regular diagnostic mammograms have helped reduce the number of breast cancer deaths in women - particularly among women over the age of 50.

Mammograms are highly effective at screening not just for breast cancer, but also for rarer types of tumors like invasive ductal and lobular cancers. Mammograms catch cancers early. In some cases, if the cancer is still early-stage, you may not even need radiation or chemotherapy for treatment.

Now, health care marketplaces like Sesame make it easier than ever to book a mammogram and save up to 60% off imaging services. Sesame offers quality care with real, licensed doctors Blackland, MS for upfront, cash prices - no insurance required.

What is a mammogram?

Mammograms are one of the primary tools that doctors use to detect breast cancer in patients. They play a key role in ensuring that cancers are caught early - before they spread and while they are still easily treatable.

Mammograms take x-rays of the breasts to screen for cancer, as well as for other abnormalities, like cysts, calcifications, and fibroadenomas. Screening mammography is one of the primary tools that doctors use to screen patients for breast cancer.

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) recommend that all women should "have a risk assessment at age 30 to see if a screen earlier than age 40 is needed."

When should a woman start getting mammograms?

It depends. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends women age 50 and older get a screening every 2 years. The American College of Radiology recommends that women ages 40 and above should get a breast exam once a year. The American Cancer Society, however, notes that "among average-risk women, clinical breast examinations to screen for breast cancer is not recommended."

Talk with your doctor about your breast exam options.

Looking for a doctor? Need a referral? Sesame can help! With Sesame's affordable, upfront pricing, you can select a service and know what you'll pay before you book your visit. Yep, it's really that simple.

What is a screening mammogram?

Mammograms are one of the primary tools that doctors use to detect breast cancer in patients. They play a key role in ensuring that cancers are caught early - before they spread and while they are still easily treatable.

Mammograms take x-rays of the breasts to screen for cancer, as well as for other abnormalities, like cysts, calcifications, and fibroadenomas. Screening mammography is one of the primary tools that doctors use to screen patients for breast cancer.

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) recommend that all women should "have a risk assessment at age 30 to see if a screen earlier than age 40 is needed."

A screening mammogram is a preliminary exam used to detect breast cancer in women who have displayed no signs or symptoms and are at average risk for cancer. A diagnostic mammogram, on the other hand, is used after a screening mammogram to examine a suspicious lump or mass in the breast.

Screening mammograms are not used for diagnosis. Instead, they offer your health care team a baseline to compare future mammograms against.

What happens during a screening mammogram?

You will be asked to disrobe from the waist up. In some clinics, you may be given a gown to wear.

During the exam, you will be asked to stand in front of an X-ray machine specially designed for mammography. A member of the imaging team will place your breast onto a platform that is raised or lowered to match your height. A clear plate will be placed on the other side of your breast to compress the tissue and spread it out. This may cause mild discomfort, but shouldn’t be painful. The platform under your breast will emit X-ray beams to create an image of the breast’s internal tissue. This image is recorded on a monitor by a technologist. This process will usually be done for both breasts. During the X-ray, you may be asked to hold your breath while the image is being taken to prevent blurring.

The procedure may take 15-30 minutes, after which time you will be instructed to change back into your regular clothes.

In most cases, you will be cleared to leave the clinic after the exam takes place. Mammograms do not require sedation, so you are free to go about your daily activities as soon as you leave the office.

What happens after my screening mammogram?

The sequence of images taken by the mammography machine will be examined and analyzed by a radiologist, a medical doctor with specialized training in interpreting diagnostic imaging. The radiologist will be looking for signs of breast cancer. After the images are reviewed, the radiologist will submit a report to your primary care provider, who will discuss the results with you. This may take 1-3 business days depending on the clinic, and when your exam was scheduled.

After your appointment, discuss the next steps with your provider. Further testing may be needed if a suspicious lump or mass was found during the test. If you do not hear about your results after 10 days of your exam, contact your primary care provider.

What is a diagnostic mammogram?

Mammograms are one of the primary tools that doctors use to detect breast cancer in patients. They play a key role in ensuring that cancers are caught early - before they spread and while they are still easily treatable.

Mammograms take x-rays of the breasts to screen for cancer, as well as for other abnormalities, like cysts, calcifications, and fibroadenomas. Screening mammography is one of the primary tools that doctors use to screen patients for breast cancer.

The American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) recommend that all women should "have a risk assessment at age 30 to see if a screen earlier than age 40 is needed."

Diagnostic mammograms are follow-up tests used to examine suspicious results of a breast screening. If the preliminary test found a lump or other changes in tissue that may indicate breast cancer, your doctor will request a diagnostic mammogram to diagnose the problem.

Diagnostic mammograms use several X-ray images to provide doctors with multiple vantage points at the area of concern.

What happens during a diagnostic mammogram?

You will be asked to disrobe from the waist up. In some clinics, you may be given a gown to wear.

During the exam, you will be asked to stand in front of an X-ray machine specially designed for mammography. A member of the imaging team will place your breast onto a platform that is raised or lowered to match your height. A clear plate will be placed on the other side of your breast to compress the tissue and spread it out. This may cause mild discomfort, but shouldn’t be painful. The platform under your breast will emit X-ray beams to create an image of the breast’s internal tissue. This image is recorded on a monitor by a technologist. This process will usually be done for both breasts. During the X-ray, you may be asked to hold your breath while the image is being taken to prevent blurring.

The procedure may take 20-30 minutes, after which time you will be instructed to change back into your regular clothes.

In most cases, you will be cleared to leave the clinic after the exam takes place. Mammograms do not require sedation, so you are free to go about your daily activities as soon as you leave the office.

What happens after my diagnostic mammogram?

The sequence of images taken by the mammography machine will be examined and analyzed by a radiologist, a medical doctor with specialized training in interpreting diagnostic imaging. The radiologist will be looking for signs of breast cancer. After the images are reviewed, the radiologist will submit a report to your primary care provider, who will discuss the results with you. This may take 1-3 business days depending on the clinic, and when your exam was scheduled.

After your appointment, discuss the next steps with your provider. Further testing may be needed, or a definitive diagnosis may have been reached. If you do not hear about your results after 10 days of your exam, contact your primary care provider.

What are 3D mammograms?

3-D mammograms are another tool that doctors use to screen for breast cancer and abnormalities. 3D mammography combines multiple x-ray breast imaging slides to create a multi-dimensional picture of the breasts.

Digital mammography is a great option for women with dense breast tissue. It detects a wider range of cancers than traditional mammograms and reduces the likelihood that you'll need to schedule follow-up appointments for further diagnostic imaging.

Looking for a 3D mammogram? No need to go through an insurance company to get the healthcare you deserve. Connect with a real, licensed doctor in Blackland, MS for one affordable, upfront price. Book your next mammogram on Sesame to save up to 60% - no insurance needed.

What do doctors look for in a mammogram interpretation?

Doctors generally look at breast density, as some data suggests that women with denser breasts get delayed diagnoses as it's harder to detect breast cancer. They also look for mass lesions and evaluate the symmetry of the glandular tissue, as a lack of symmetry can sometimes be an indicator of an underlying issue. But often the earliest sign can be tiny micro-calcifications, which look like tiny specs of white in a mammogram that may indicate early cancer.

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