Eczema treatment in Mount Pleasant, MI

Struggling with dry skin or ezcema? Connect directly with a quality dermatologist, doctor, or specialist on Sesame who can evaluate your condition and craft a treatment plan that's right for you. Skin consults available today at affordable cash prices to get your relief for itchy skin.

Eczema is a chronic condition that results in dry, itchy, red, and inflamed skin.

Eczema affects 1 in 10 Americans, from infants to adults 65 and olderAccording to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). There are several types of eczema, including:

Atopic dermatitis: The most common form of eczema, atopic dermatitis is caused by a weakened natural barrier of the skin, leaving you more vulnerable to irritants and allergens. Atopic dermatitis can be caused by environmental factors, a weakened immune system, or genetics.

Contact dermatitis: Contact dermatitis can be caused by an allergic reaction to something you touch or by chemicals and harsh substance you may come into contact with. This can be caused by certain cleaning products (like bleach), poison ivy, skin care products, latex, or nickel metal.

Hand eczema: Hand eczema, as the its name suggests, is eczema that only affects the hands. It can often be caused by cleaning products, hair products, or laundry products.

Neurodermatitis: The cause of Neurodermatitis is unknown. It can occur along with chronic skin conditions, and can be triggered by stress. The irritated area becomes itchier as it is scratched, leading to wounds or skin infections.

Nummular eczema: Nummular eczema describes a skin condition that results in itchy, coin-shaped spots on the skin. These spots can become crusty, scaly, or leak fluid. Nummular eczema can be caused by irritation from a bug bite, an allergic reaction, or excessively dry skin.

Stasis dermatitis: According to the AAD, about 15-20 million people above the age of 50 live with stasis dermatitis. Stasis dermatitis results in affected skin that is rough, itchy, and red around varicose veins. Stasis dermatitis usually occurs due to poor blood flow in the legs. This skin condition can worsen and cause adverse side effects such as wounds, discoloration, and pain.

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About eczema

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Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a condition that causes your skin to become itchy, red, and scaly. It is a chronic but non-contagious condition that may be accompanied by other symptoms of irritation or allergic reaction, such as asthma. In most cases, eczema flares up when the skin is exposed to an irritant or allergen but subsides after some time. Some people may experience flare-ups and healing periods several times a year. During a flare-up, some common symptoms of eczema include:

  • Dry skin
  • Itchy skin
  • Cracked, leathery, or scaly skin
  • Red rashes
  • Small bumps on the skin that may leak fluid

Eczema affects nearly 15 million Americans every year but is most common among children. Like other forms of dermatitis, eczema can be uncomfortable and very itchy. It will not, however, damage other parts of the body or the skin. There is no cure for eczema, but symptoms can usually be managed with a combination of self-care and medical treatment options.

Treatment Options

Eczema is a generally mild condition that can be managed with a few methods. Take a look below to browse different options. During your appointment for eczema, talk to your health care provider about what treatment plan might be right for you.

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FAQs

Eczema

What is eczema?

Eczema is a chronic condition that results in dry, itchy, red, and inflamed skin.

Eczema affects 1 in 10 Americans, from infants to adults 65 and olderAccording to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). There are several types of eczema, including:

Atopic dermatitis: The most common form of eczema, atopic dermatitis is caused by a weakened natural barrier of the skin, leaving you more vulnerable to irritants and allergens. Atopic dermatitis can be caused by environmental factors, a weakened immune system, or genetics.

Contact dermatitis: Contact dermatitis can be caused by an allergic reaction to something you touch or by chemicals and harsh substance you may come into contact with. This can be caused by certain cleaning products (like bleach), poison ivy, skin care products, latex, or nickel metal.

Hand eczema: Hand eczema, as the its name suggests, is eczema that only affects the hands. It can often be caused by cleaning products, hair products, or laundry products.

Neurodermatitis: The cause of Neurodermatitis is unknown. It can occur along with chronic skin conditions, and can be triggered by stress. The irritated area becomes itchier as it is scratched, leading to wounds or skin infections.

Nummular eczema: Nummular eczema describes a skin condition that results in itchy, coin-shaped spots on the skin. These spots can become crusty, scaly, or leak fluid. Nummular eczema can be caused by irritation from a bug bite, an allergic reaction, or excessively dry skin.

Stasis dermatitis: According to the AAD, about 15-20 million people above the age of 50 live with stasis dermatitis. Stasis dermatitis results in affected skin that is rough, itchy, and red around varicose veins. Stasis dermatitis usually occurs due to poor blood flow in the legs. This skin condition can worsen and cause adverse side effects such as wounds, discoloration, and pain.

What are the symptoms of eczema?

Eczema can take different forms and present different symptoms - mostly based on where the affected skin is located on the body. According to the National Eczema Association, most types of eczema cause similar symptoms, which include:

  • Itchy skin

  • Dry skin

  • Inflamed and discolored skin

  • Crusting

  • Scaly patches of skin

Depending on the type of eczema you are experiencing, these symptoms may vary. For instance, patients with stasis dermatitis often experience symptoms in the lower legs, near varicose veins. Those with hand eczema often experience scaly, itchy patches of skin on the hands and wrists. The severity and duration of these symptoms can differ from person to person. Some patients may experience flare-ups due to very dry skin or an allergic reaction. Some patients may only experience a brief period of symptoms, and nothing more.

How is eczema treated?

There is no cure for eczema, but there are treatment plans that can help manage and ease symptoms. These treatments include:

Over-the-counter medication: Anti-allergy medications such as antihistamines and topical anti-itch cream can help fight itchiness and inflammation of the affected skin. Non-prescription hydrocortisone creams can also help temporarily relieve itching, which may help the condition improve.

Moisturizing: Moisturizers, such as lotions, oils, or ointment can help reduce dryness and relieve itching. Moisturizing twice a day has been shown to soothe skin and relieve symptoms. If you are using a hydrocortisone cream, it is best to apply the hydrocortisone after moisturizing so that the cream can be more easily absorbed by the skin.

Phototherapy: If a patient experiences flare-ups due to topical treatments, phototherapy (or light therapy) has been shown to reduce symptoms of eczema. Phototherapy is a process that exposes the patient to controlled doses of natural sunlight or UV rays. There are dangers associated with sun-exposure, however, such as skin cancer and accelerated skin aging. Because of this, phototherapy is rarely used as a long term treatment plan for eczema in adults, and is never used for children or infants.

Prescription medication: For some severe or persistent cases of eczema, a doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory medication to help reduce irritation and fight itchiness. These prescription medications may come in the form of an oral corticosteroid (such as prednisone), or topical steroid creams. It is recommended that you apply these medications after moisturizing to best help the medication penetrate the skin. Along with a corticosteroid treatment plan, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics to help keep bacteria from infecting the open cracks or sores on the surface of the skin.

While there is no known cure for eczema, the side effects of eczema can be reduced and relieved with either at-home remedies, or prescription medication. Moisturizers, anti-itch creams, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory drugs have all been shown to help patients manage their itching while reducing redness and scaly skin. Many of these methods proven effective in minimizing side effects.

How long does eczema last?

Eczema is a highly persistent skin condition that usually won't go away with out treatment. Unaddressed eczema can lead to open wounds, discolored skin, and bacterial skin diseases.

While there is no known cure for eczema, at-home remedies have been shown to help reduce side effects and symptoms associated with the condition. Common at-home remedies include:

Moisturizing: Moisturizing once or twice daily can help soothe skin. Dry skin can cause flare-ups of eczema, so keeping skin moisturized not only helps reduce the side effects of eczema, but also can help prevent flare-ups from occurring.

Cool compress: Soak a clean washcloth in cold bathwater and apply it to itchy and inflamed skin. The cool compress can help reduce the inflammatory swelling that can occur, while soothing itching.

Oatmeal baths: Add colloidal oatmeal to a lukewarm bath and soak affected skin to relieve itching and reduce irritation. Studies have shown that colloidal oatmeal protects skin and diminishes inflammatory cells that can lead to flare-ups.

Using gentle soaps and detergents: Because contact dermatitis can be caused by exposure to harsh chemicals and bleaches found in some cleaning products, swapping these products out for products that use natural ingredients and gentle cleansing compounds can help prevent flare-ups. Look for fragrance-free, color-free, and exfoliant free products to help soothe the skin and reduce irritation.

Allergy medication: Because many forms of eczema flare-up due to irritation from allergens, taking an oral antihistamine or using anti-itch topical gel can help minimize the body’s reaction to allergens.

Protect the skin: Eczema gets itchier the more it is scratched. Continued scratching can lead to bleeding, open sores, and bacterial infections. Keeping the skin under clothing, using anti-itch treatments (such as those listed above), and keeping the skin moisturized can help prevent itchy, dry skin.

If eczema is persistent or severe, speak with your primary care doctor or dermatologist about treatment options. Dermatologists are specially trained to diagnose and treat severe skin conditions like eczema and can prescribe maximum-strength medication to help alleviate the discomfort that comes with it.

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