Prescription Antibiotics for Skin Infections in New Castle, PA

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About Skin infection

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Skin infections occur when a pathogen - an organism that causes disease - affects the skin. Skin infections may be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. Most skin infections are mild and can be treated with over-the-counter medication and self-care methods. More severe infections, however, may require medical attention.

Below are common skin infections, grouped into the organism that causes them:

Bacterial Infections:

- Cellulitis: A potentially life-threatening infection caused by the Staphylococcus and Streptococcus (strep) bacteria. Cellulitis results in red, painful, and inflamed skin. Cellulitis doesn’t transfer from person to person but can spread across the body.

- Impetigo: A mild skin infection that commonly affects young children (younger than 12). Impetigo results in sores on the skin that cluster around the nose and mouth. This infection is highly contagious but produces mild symptoms.

- Boils: Also known as furuncles, boils are bacterial infections of hair follicles. Bacteria enter the skin through an opening of the skin and affect the tissue around a hair follicle. This results in a painful raised bump around the infected follicle.

Viral Infections:

- Chickenpox: Chickenpox - or varicella - is a common viral condition that primarily affects young children. The virus causes fever, as well as an itchy red rash that spreads across the body. Chickenpox is highly contagious, but it is rare to have the disease more than once.

- Shingles: Shingles is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Once you’ve had chickenpox, the virus remains dormant in the body. The virus can reactivate after years, causing a painful, red rash that crusts over across the body. Shingles is not contagious, but the virus can cause chickenpox in individuals who have not yet had it, or who aren’t vaccinated.

- Warts: Warts are very common infections caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). There are several different kinds of warts, which appear in different parts of the body. These growths commonly occur on the feet, toes, and hands. Warts - small rough bumps in the skin - are relatively harmless, but may result in bleeding and pain.

Fungal infections:

- Athlete’s foot/ Jock itch: These fungal infections occur in moist areas of the body such as the feet and groin. The fungi that cause athlete’s foot and jock itch can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces such as locker room floors and clothing. Once the fungus infects the skin, it causes an itchy red rash.

- Yeast infections: The candida fungus grows naturally, and is balanced by your immune system. A change in hormones, antibiotic use, or douching can disrupt this balance, which leads to an overgrowth of candida. Yeast infections can cause abnormal discharge, itching, and irritation in the affected area.

- Ringworm: Not actually a worm, this fungal infection results in a red, ring-like rash in the affected area. These itchy patches of skin can blister and may spread to other parts of the body. Ringworm is contagious and may be spread through contact with pets, or contaminated surfaces (such as locker room floors).

Parasite infections:

- Lice: These tiny wingless insects feed by drawing blood from just under the skin. This causes extreme itchiness and sores from scratching. Lice are highly contagious and are easily transmitted through contact with the contaminated area or the personal items of an infected individual.

- Bed bugs: Bed bugs are tiny insects that live in areas such as the corners of rooms, sheets, and clothing. These parasites feed by drawing blood from exposed skin and are extremely difficult to get rid of. They cause an itchy, red rash that is usually arranged in a cluster or line of bite marks.

- Scabies: Scabies are microscopic mites that burrow and lay eggs in the skin. The mites then multiply and cause an itchy, red rash. Scabies are highly contagious, but can usually be effectively treated with medication.

Talk to a health care provider if you are experiencing an unexplained rash or blistering. These are the most common symptoms of a skin infection. Because these infections can be so contagious, you must begin treatment early to prevent spread.

Treatment Options

Doctors and providers on Sesame offer the following medications often used to treat {{ searchTerm }} for just $5 with free delivery. Book a visit today to discuss if the following medication can be part of a treatment for {{ searchTerm }}.

Note that all prescriptions are at your provider's discretion.

Below is a summary of common treatment options for skin infections. Specific treatment will depend on your symptoms and the cause of your infection. During your appointment, tell your provider about your symptoms and discuss the treatment plan that’s right for you.

FAQs

Skin Infection

What are skin infections?

Skin infections occur when a pathogen - an organism that causes disease - affects the skin. Skin infections may be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites. Most skin infections are mild and can be treated with over-the-counter medication and self-care methods. More severe infections, however, may require medical attention.

What are the common types of skin infections?

Below are common skin infections, grouped into the organism that causes them:

Bacterial Skin Infections:

- Cellulitis/ erysipelas: Potentially life-threatening infections caused by the Staphylococcus and Streptococcus (strep) bacteria which result in red, painful, and inflamed skin. These infections don’t transfer from person to person but can spread across the body.

- Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA): Another highly contagious form of Staph infection, MRSA is commonly transmitted through skin-to-skin contact and results in swollen, painful bumps on the skin.

- Impetigo: A mild skin infection that commonly affects young children (younger than 12). Impetigo results in lesions on the skin that cluster around the nose and mouth. This infection is highly contagious but produces mild symptoms.

- Boils: Also known as furuncles, boils are bacterial infections of hair follicles. Bacteria enter the skin through an opening of the skin and affect the tissue around a hair follicle. This results in a painful raised bump around the infected follicle.

Viral Skin Infections:

- Chickenpox: Chickenpox - or varicella - is a common viral condition that primarily affects young children. The virus causes fever, as well as an itchy red rash that spreads across the body. Chickenpox is highly contagious, but it is rare to have the disease more than once.

- Shingles: Shingles is caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. Once you’ve had chickenpox, the virus remains dormant in the body. The virus can reactivate after years, causing a painful, red rash that crusts over across the body. Shingles is not contagious, but the virus can cause chickenpox in individuals who have not yet had it, or who aren’t vaccinated.

- Warts: Warts are very common infections caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). There are several different kinds of warts, which appear in different parts of the body. These growths commonly occur on the feet, toes, and hands. Warts - small rough bumps in the skin - are relatively harmless, but may result in bleeding and pain.

Fungal Skin infections:

- Athlete’s foot/ Jock itch: These fungal infections occur in moist areas of the body such as the feet and groin. The fungi that cause athlete’s foot and jock itch can be transmitted via contaminated surfaces such as locker room floors and clothing. Once the fungus infects the skin, it causes an itchy red rash.

- Yeast infections: The candida fungus grows naturally, and is balanced by your immune system. A change in hormones, antibiotic use, or douching can disrupt this balance, which leads to an overgrowth of candida. Yeast infections can cause abnormal discharge, itching, and irritation in the affected area.

- Ringworm: Not actually a worm, this fungal infection results in a red, ring-like rash in the affected area. These itchy patches of skin can blister and may spread to other parts of the body. Ringworm is contagious and may be spread through contact with pets, or contaminated surfaces (such as locker room floors).

Parasitic Skin Infections:

- Lice: These tiny wingless insects feed by drawing blood from just under the skin. This causes extreme itchiness and sores from scratching. Lice are highly contagious and are easily transmitted through contact with the contaminated area or the personal items of an infected individual.

- Bed bugs: Bed bugs are tiny insects that live in areas such as the corners of rooms, sheets, and clothing. These parasites feed by drawing blood from exposed skin and are extremely difficult to get rid of. They cause an itchy, red rash that is usually arranged in a cluster or line of bite marks.

- Scabies: Scabies are microscopic mites that burrow and lay eggs in the skin. The mites then multiply and cause an itchy, red rash. Scabies are highly contagious, but can usually be effectively treated with medication.

What are the symptoms of skin infection?

The signs of a skin infection vary depending on the organism that has caused the infection. Talk to a health care provider for medical advice and treatment if you experience symptoms such as:
- Skin abscesses
- Lesions on the skin
- Boils or blisters
- Wound infections
- Purulent discharge (pus draining from the skin)
- Dark or necrotic skin
- Red or itching skin


Many skin infections are easily treated with antimicrobial medication, antibiotic treatment, or other forms of medication. Skin infections can lead to serious complications if left untreated, however, so seeking medical attention right away is strongly recommended.

How are skin infections treated?

The medication used to treat skin infections will depend on the cause of the infection. Various forms of medication used for the treatment of skin infections are detailed below.

Antiviral Therapy

Most viral infections of the skin will go away on their own, however, severe infections may require antiviral treatment. Common forms of antiviral medication include:
- Acyclovir (generic Zovirax)
- Famciclovir (Famvir)
- Valacyclovir (Valtrex)


Antibiotic Therapy

Bacterial skin and soft-tissue infections respond well to a group of medications classified as beta-lactam antibiotics. These drugs include penicillin derivatives and cephalosporins. Common forms of these medications include:
- Amoxicillin
- Cephalexin
- Clindamycin
- Cefazolin (often administered as an intravenous injection for severe infections)
- Dicloxacillin
- Doxycycline
- Mupirocin
- Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole
- Vancomycin


These medications are commonly prescribed as oral antibiotics (a tablet taken by mouth) or topical antibiotics (a gel or cream applied to the skin). Depending on the patient and infection, doctors may choose to prescribe a natural form of antibiotic medication - known as a macrolide.

Common forms of macrolides approved by the FDA include:
- Zithromax
- Azithromycin
- Erythromycin


Antifungal Therapy

Antifungal medication may be prescribed for the treatment of fungal infections (such as athlete’s foot or jock itch). Common forms of antifungal medication include:
- Clotrimazole
- Terbinafine
- Fluconazole


Parasites

Parasites are usually treated with professional extermination and washing.

How can I relieve the symptoms of skin infection at home?

There are several self-care strategies you can use to minimize the symptoms of a skin infection, including:

- Don’t scratch: Scratching infections can make the rash worse while spreading the contaminant that caused the condition to different areas of the body. If you need to, apply clean bandages to affected areas of the skin to prevent the urge to itch.

- Take OTC antihistamines: Over-the-counter antihistamines (such as Benadryl or Claritin) can reduce the itching symptoms associated with a skin infection.

- Apply cool compresses: To relieve the itching and discomfort caused by a rash, apply clean cool compresses directly to the skin. It is crucial that you do not reuse towels before washing them, as repeated exposure to the rash or blisters can contaminate the cloth with the pathogen causing the infection. You can apply these compresses for 15-30 minutes, 3-4 times a day to reduce symptoms.

What kind of doctor should I see about a skin infection?

If you are experiencing signs of a skin infection (such as a rash, blisters, pus, or itching) talk to your primary care provider about your symptoms. Depending on the severity and cause of the infection, a primary care provider can prescribe medication or refer you to a Doctor of Dermatology - also known as a dermatologist - for further care.

What is dermatology?

Dermatology is a specialized branch of medicine that focuses on the skin, hair, and nails. Doctors of dermatology (dermatologists) specialize in treating conditions that affect these parts of the body, including skin diseases and some cosmetic conditions.

Conditions that dermatologists treat include:
- Acne
- Melanoma (skin cancer)
- Psoriasis
- Eczema
- Dermatitis
- Hair disease/ hair loss
- Rosacea
- Moles
- Canker sores
- Vitiligo

What is a dermatologist?

Dermatologists practice a specialized type of medicine focusing on the skin. A dermatologist is trained in diagnosing and treating diseases of the skin, hair, and nails, promoting skin health, managing cosmetic skin disorders, and more.

Dermatologists can carry out specialized diagnostic procedures related to skin conditions. They can use treatments including externally applied, injected, and internal medicines, ultraviolet light therapy, surgical procedures, and more. They may also perform cosmetic procedures like chemical peels, sclerotherapy, and microdermabrasion.

What does a dermatologist do?

Dermatologists are highly specialized medical doctors who are trained to treat conditions of the skin, hair, and nails. They can specialize in several dermatologic specialties, including:

- Pediatric dermatology: Pediatric dermatologists specialize in diagnosing and treating skin conditions in children. They treat conditions like birthmarks, warts, eczema, or psoriasis.

- Dermatopathology: Dermatopathologists are doctors who specialize in both dermatology and pathology. This means they are trained to examine biopsied parts of the skin and write a biopsy report to determine the possibility of skin cancers (such as melanoma) or skin disease (such as impetigo, vitiligo, or warts). Some dermatopathologists undergo special training to be able to perform Mohs surgery, a precise technique used to get rid of skin cancer cells. The dermatopathologist uses a scalpel to remove cancer on the skin, as well as a thin layer of skin below. Once removed, this tissue is taken to a laboratory for analysis. This analysis helps the dermatopathologist determine if all the cancer cells from the skin have been removed, or if further surgery is needed.

- Cosmetic dermatology: Cosmetic dermatologists are doctors who specialize in aesthetic skin care, treating conditions including acne, wrinkles, sagging skin, or varicose veins. These doctors are trained to perform cosmetic procedures like filler injections for sagging skin, laser skin resurfacing, or chemical peels.

Dermatologists must complete 4 years of a bachelor’s degree, 4 years of medical school, an internship, and a 3-year residency. After finishing their residency, a dermatologist can complete an exam to earn certification from the American Board of Dermatology. Board certification ensures that the dermatologist has the expertise and qualifications necessary to treat conditions of the skin, hair, and nails.

What should I see a dermatologist for?

A dermatologist can help you manage your overall skin health. Dermatologists evaluate and treat disorders of the skin, hair, nails, and adjacent mucous membranes.

This includes skin ailments such as moles, contact dermatitis, rashes, genetic skin diseases, acne, and more.

Seeing a dermatologist is also an essential part of preventing common skin problems like atopic dermatitis and hair loss.

What is the difference between dermatology and skin care?

Dermatologists are medical doctors who undergo special training to diagnose and treat various dermatological needs. Some conditions dermatologists are trained to diagnose and treat include:

- Eczema: Eczema is a red and itchy rash that is caused by irritants and allergens. Dermatologists can treat eczema with topical corticosteroid creams, moisturizers, or oral medication.

- Psoriasis: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, condition that flares in cycles. A psoriasis flareup can cause red, itchy, and flaky skin on the torso, knees, elbows, or scalp. Dermatologists can treat psoriasis with topical creams, light therapy, or oral medication.

- Dermatitis: Dermatitis refers to skin irritation that results in red, itchy, and dry skin. This can be caused by an allergic reaction, eczema, or yeast in the oil of the skin. A dermatologist can prescribe light therapy, creams, gels, or oral medication.

Skin care, on the other hand, is handled by estheticians, professionals who specialize in the cosmetics of the skin. Estheticians are not medical doctors and cannot diagnose skin conditions or prescribe medication. They perform elective skin treatments that can help the appearance of the skin. Estheticians can perform cosmetic procedures such as waxing, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, and hair removal.

What is the fastest way to see a dermatologist?

If you are experiencing an urgent skin condition that requires immediate attention, book a video visit with a real doctor in New Castle, PA on Sesame right away. If your skin condition is not urgent, or if you prefer to see a dermatologist in person, book your next appointment through Sesame.

Doctors on Sesame can treat common skin conditions including:
- Rashes
- Burns
- Atopic dermatitis
- Bug bites
- Cold sores


Dermatologists generally treat chronic and long-lasting skin conditions such as acne, dermatitis, warts, and skin cancers. If you are experiencing any of these conditions, it is recommended that you book a video dermatology consult through a telehealth platform like Sesame.

Can I see a dermatologist online?

Yep! Telehealth has made it easier than ever to speak to a licensed dermatologist from the comfort of your home. Sesame offers video skin consults with real, quality doctors near you. Dermatologists on Sesame can diagnose a wide range of skin conditions including:
- Acne
- Eczema
- Rashes
- Psoriasis
- Hair loss
- Atopic dermatitis
- Warts


Video skin care consults on Sesame start at just $26 for a 15-minute visit. Search for the doctor you want to see, compare prices, and save up to 60% on your visit with our affordable cash-pay prices. Sesame works directly with doctors - not insurance networks- so you don't ever have to worry about surprise bills or copays. Just quality care at affordable prices. Book a skin care visit with a doctor near you today!

What happens in a dermatology consultation?

Most dermatology consultations start with the doctor reviewing the patient's medical history and asking about symptoms or complications the patient may be experiencing. After these initial steps, a physical exam, or a visual exam, of the affected area will usually be done so that the doctor can assess what skin condition may be affecting the patient. In certain cases, based on the doctor's findings, further testing may need to be done. These tests may include blood tests, skin samples, or biopsies to check for cancers or underlying conditions.

If further testing is not required, the dermatologist or physician can give medical advice to the patient about treatment plan options and next steps. This way the patient has an understanding of available options and possible next steps.

There are no risks associated with video dermatology consultations, as these online visits are meant to diagnose conditions. Video dermatology consultations can play a key part in creating treatment plan options to help reduce the effects of skin conditions and catch skin issues before they become more severe.

What is an online skin doctor appointment?

Video skin consultations are a form of dermatology care used to connect patients to primary care providers and board-certified dermatologists, for skin health conditions such as acne, warts, moles, and skin cancers, as well as urgent care concerns such as bug bites, burns, rashes, and cold sores.

Sesame offers both dermatology and skin consult appointments via video visits. Video skin consults are primarily used to help patients with urgent care concerns regarding the skin (such as those listed above). However, these visits can also help individuals determine whether or not they need to see a specialist to address their concerns. If you aren't sure whether or not you need to see a dermatologist, video skin consultations may be helpful in answering some of your questions and helping you with next steps.

What are the benefits of video dermatology consult?

Video dermatology consultations help patients address skin conditions without the hassle and stress of office visits. Video consultations mean no wait times, no crowds, and visits on your own schedule. Video dermatology consultations can help patients get medical advice and treatment plan options for conditions such as:
- Acne
- Eczema
- Rashes
- Psoriasis
- Rosacea


In some cases, follow-up visits may be required. Depending on the severity of the patient's skin condition, or if there is a risk of skin cancer, your dermatologist may request an in-person face-to-face office visit to get a skin sample or a biopsy.

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