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About Vertigo

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Vertigo is a type of dizziness that causes you to feel as though the “room is spinning”. The feeling of a spinning motion when you’re motionless is the most common sensation associated with vertigo. Vertigo is not an illness. Instead, it is a common symptom resulting from a condition. Common causes of vertigo and dizziness include:

- Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): Your inner ear contains microscopic crystals that help orient you and monitor the movement of your head. When these crystals become displaced, any sudden movement - such as standing up quickly - can make you feel dizzy. BPPV is the medical term for this occurrence.

- Vestibular neuritis: An inflammation of the vestibular nerve, vestibular neuritis can cause prolonged episodes of vertigo and dizziness, as well as hearing loss.

- Labyrinthitis: An infection of the inner ear, labyrinthitis is commonly triggered by a common cold or the flu. Labyrinthitis can cause vertigo, dizziness, and hearing loss.

- Meniere’s disease: Meniere’s disease can affect people of any age but is most commonly found in adults between the ages of 40-65. Changes in the inner ear result in episodes of vertigo, dizziness, hearing loss, and tinnitus.

Other common causes of vertigo include:

  • Headaches
  • Ear infections
  • Head injury
  • Stroke
  • Multiple sclerosis

Vertigo is a very common sensation that nearly everyone experiences from time to time. If you experience persistent vertigo or dizziness, talk to your doctor. Vertigo in and of itself is not a cause for concern, but if the symptom does not go away after a few seconds, or if it recurs frequently, it may signify a serious health condition.

Treatment Options

Doctors and providers on Sesame offer the following medications often used to treat {{ searchTerm }} for just $5 with free delivery. Book a visit today to discuss if the following medication can be part of a treatment for {{ searchTerm }}.

Note that all prescriptions are at your provider's discretion.

Treatment for vertigo depends on the condition causing the symptom. Most instances of vertigo will go away on their own without medical help. In some cases, medical attention may be required. Below are common treatments for vertigo. During your appointment, talk to your provider about the treatment plan that’s best for you.

FAQs

Vertigo

What is vertigo?

Vertigo is a type of dizziness that causes you to feel as though the “room is spinning”. The feeling of a spinning motion when you’re motionless is the most common sensation associated with vertigo. Vertigo is not an illness. Instead, it is a common symptom resulting from a condition.

Vertigo is a very common sensation that nearly everyone experiences from time to time. If you experience persistent vertigo or dizziness, talk to your doctor. Vertigo in and of itself is not a cause for concern, but if the symptom does not go away after a few seconds, or if it recurs frequently, it may signify a serious health condition.

What conditions cause vertigo?

Common causes of vertigo and dizziness include:

- Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV): Your inner ear contains microscopic crystals that help orient you and monitor the movement of your head. When these crystals become displaced, any sudden movement - such as standing up quickly - can make you feel dizzy. BPPV is the medical term for this occurrence.

- Vestibular neuritis: An inflammation of the vestibular nerve, vestibular neuritis can cause prolonged episodes of vertigo and dizziness, as well as hearing loss.

- Labyrinthitis: An infection of the inner ear, labyrinthitis is commonly triggered by a common cold or the flu. Labyrinthitis can cause vertigo, dizziness, and hearing loss.

- Meniere’s disease: Meniere’s disease can affect people of any age but is most commonly found in adults between the ages of 40-65. Changes in the inner ear result in episodes of vertigo, dizziness, hearing loss, and tinnitus.

Other common underlying causes of dizziness/ vertigo include:

  • Headaches/ migraines
  • Ear infections
  • Inner ear disorders
  • Ear canal surgery
  • Sinus infections
  • Balance disorders
  • Low blood pressure
  • Head injury
  • Stroke

What are the symptoms of vertigo?

Vertigo is itself a symptom, a feeling of dizziness associated with other medical conditions.
- Dizziness - or; a spinning sensation
- Lightheadedness
- Balance problems
- Tinnitus - a ringing in the ears
- Uncontrollable eye movements
- Motion sickness

Are there different types of vertigo?

Vertigo is commonly classified into two types. Peripheral vertigo occurs when symptoms are caused by a condition affecting the inner ear. Central vertigo occurs when symptoms are caused by a condition affecting the vestibular system - a part of the greater central nervous system. Peripheral vertigo is generally milder and shorter-lived than central vertigo, which can last for long periods of time.

How is vertigo treated?

Treatment for vertigo depends on the condition causing the symptom. Most instances of vertigo will go away on their own without medical help. In some cases, medical attention may be required.

Medication is rarely needed to treat vertigo. For severe and persistent cases of vertigo, or vertigo caused by labyrinthitis and labyrinthitis, your doctor may prescribe an oral antihistamine (such as meclizine) to reduce your symptoms. The symptoms of Meniere’s disease are often treated with a low-sodium diet and a prescription for diuretics - also known as “water pills”.

BPPV is treated with a procedure called Canalith repositioning. This non-invasive procedure involves moving your head into several different positions to move displaced crystals from the inner ear back to where they are supposed to be. This can help you regain your sense of balance and reduce the dizziness symptoms caused by BPPV. This procedure may be supplemented with an anti-nausea antihistamine - such as meclizine - to prevent vertigo and nausea caused by the “spinning” sensation. In addition, some clinical trials have shown that Vitamin D and calcium supplements help reduce the frequency of vertigo episodes and lessen the severity of vertigo symptoms, in patients managing BPPV.

What can I do to treat vertigo at home?

Many cases of vertigo can be treated with simple at-home strategies. These include:
- Sit down or lie down when you begin to feel “spinning” sensations
- Avoid sudden movements or changes in position that can trigger vertigo
- Squat instead of bending over to pick up objects on the ground
- Use a cane or walker if you are at risk of falling and injuring yourself
- Turn on lights if you need to get up at night

Can physical therapy help vertigo?

Yes! Working with a licensed physical therapist can help to strengthen muscles and improve your balance. A physical therapist can teach you efficient and safe methods for sitting, standing, and crouching to help prevent dizziness from sudden head movements. These exercises are known as vestibular rehabilitation. By helping you build strength and musculature, PT can also help you gain control of those movements. Sitting or standing slowly can be more taxing on your muscles and joints, so strengthening those areas can help ensure that you can change body positions comfortably and safely.

What kind of doctor should I see about vertigo?

The first step in getting treatment for vertigo is to talk about your symptoms and health history with a primary care provider. During a primary care appointment, your physician can talk with you about what you’ve been experiencing and may perform a physical exam to determine the possible causes of your vertigo.

Depending on what your provider thinks may be causing vertigo symptoms, they may refer you to a specialist. These doctors have specialized training to address specific parts of the body and may be able to provide more comprehensive care. Audiologists are vertigo specialists that treat balance disorders, hearing loss, and auditory problems. If your primary care provider believes that your symptoms are being caused by a condition affecting the inner ear, you may be referred to an audiologist for further evaluation.

A Doctor of Otolaryngology (also known as an ear, nose, and throat doctor) specializes in care related to those parts of the body. If your primary care provider believes that your symptoms are being caused by a condition affecting the inner ear, sinus cavity, or another part of the vestibular system, you may be referred to an ENT.

If your primary care provider believes that a condition affecting the brain or central nervous system is causing your symptoms, you may be referred to a Doctor of Neurology (also known as a neurologist). A neurologist can help diagnose and treat conditions such as brain tumors, or head injuries.

What is an audiologist?

Audiologists are health care professionals who specialize in diagnosing and treating conditions related to hearing loss, balance disorders, and other auditory problems. Audiologists usually obtain and bachelor's degree and a master’s degree in audiology from an accredited university. Most then earn a Doctor of Audiology (AuD) degree. After receiving their doctoral degree, audiologists obtain licensure from the state in which they practice and accreditation from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). ASHA awards a Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology (CCC-A)to qualified professionals.

What conditions do audiologists treat?

Audiologists can diagnose and treat conditions related to hearing disorders, balance problems, and the impairment of certain neural systems. Some examples of services audiologists provide include:

  • Hearing tests: Audiologists can perform hearing tests using listening devices and scoping tools to help determine the cause of hearing loss and the degree of hearing impairment.

- Hearing impairment/ loss: Audiologists are trained to diagnose and treat hearing disorders such as hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and hearing impairment due to damage to the inner ear. Depending on the level of hearing loss they find, audiologists may recommend treatment plans. These could include hearing aids, devices that help patients recover hearing ability.

  • Hearing assistance devices: If your audiologist uncovers signs of hearing impairment, they may recommend hearing assistance devices such as hearing aids, cochlear implants, and audiologic therapy to help repair or lessen hearing loss.

  • Balance disorders and dizziness treatment: Audiologists don't just treat hearing loss - they are also experts in balance disorders, which are often caused by conditions in the ear. Some examples of these conditions include inner ear damage, neurological disorders, and head injuries. Audiologists will perform tests to determine the cause of the balance disorders and work with you to create a treatment plan that can help improve balance. Audiologists are also trained to perform vestibular rehabilitation, a series of exercises that can help reposition the head and body.

How do audiologists treat balance disorders?

Audiologists receive special training to help assess and diagnose balance problems caused by conditions in the ear. Common symptoms of balance disorders include:

  • Difficulty walking

  • Falling

  • Lightheadedness

  • Blurred vision

  • Vertigo

  • Weakness in arms or legs

Balance problems can result from a number of underlying conditions - including hearing disorders. An audiologist will first test your hearing and examine your ears to determine if they are the cause of the problem.

If your audiologist finds that an ear disorder is causing your balance problems, they may recommend vestibular rehabilitation, a program of exercises that helps patients improve balance and reduce dizziness. Some common types of vestibular rehabilitation exercises are:

  • Posture training

  • Walking training

  • Neck mobility and stretching

  • Vision stability training

  • Strengthening exercises

Depending on your condition, vestibular rehabilitation can usually take somewhere between 6-8 weeks, with sessions taking place once or twice a week. Vestibular rehabilitation has been shown to be very effective in reducing dizziness and correcting balance problems.

What happens during a dizziness/ vertigo evaluation?

Audiologists perform these evaluations to get a sense of your balance and determine possible factors causing vertigo symptoms. During a dizziness/ vertigo evaluation, you will be asked about your medical history, any medication you may be taking, and your experience with vertigo symptoms.

After this preliminary consultation, peripheral assessments and balance testing will be conducted. Depending upon the results generated, a recommendation for additional follow-up testing or referral to a specialist (such as a neurologist or otolaryngologist) may be provided.

What is physical therapy?

Physical therapy (or PT) is a healthcare service used to relieve pain, prevent injuries, and improve quality of life. The need for physical therapy is determined through medical history and physical examination. Treatment plans include manual therapy (such as massage), functional strength training, and exercise programs that help cardiovascular and pulmonary health.

What is the goal of physical therapy?

Physical therapy can be whatever you make it.

Most people start physical therapy services to help relieve pain or increase range of motion caused by:
- Sports-related injuries (such as torn a torn rotator cuff or sprains)
- Car accidents
- Neurological conditions (such as stroke, Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, ALS)
- Shoulder pain
- Knee pain
- Neck pain/ back pain
- Osteoarthritis


Of course, injuries aren't the only reason patients begin physical therapy.

Physical therapy is common for aging patients, as it can help with such things as:
- Fall prevention
- Injury prevention
- Range of motion
- Mobility
- Pain management for aging joints


Chronic pain can be, well, a pain. Physical therapy can play a key role in health and wellness, by relieving pain and correcting imbalances in the body. Don't wait to start feeling better. Save up to 60% when you book a physical therapy session on Sesame.

What does a physical therapist do?

A physical therapist (or PT), is a healthcare professional with specialized orthopedic, musculoskeletal, and neurological training. A candidate for a doctoral degree in physical therapy must be a graduate of an accredited higher education institution that offers a Doctor of Physical Therapy (or DPT) degree. Physical therapist assistants (or PTAs) provide physical therapy services under the direction of a physical therapist. PTAs must graduate from a Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)-accredited educational program and pass a national exam to receive licensure. The American Physical Therapy Association (or APTA) is the professional organization that supports physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and physical therapy students. Sesame’s network of top-reviewed physical therapists makes finding a quality, fully licensed provider at an affordable price easier than ever.

What is a typical physical therapy session like?

If you've never had a physical therapy appointment before, your first session will usually begin with a physical evaluation. Your therapist will ask you questions about any chronic pain you experience. They may ask about your medical history and previous mobility. You may also be asked to perform a few light exercises or stretches so the therapist can measure your ability to move and balance.

After your evaluation, your physical therapist will work with you to create a treatment plan. A physiotherapy treatment plan is similar to a fitness routine you might get from a personal trainer. It will outline the exercises and strategies that you will perform with your therapist, as well as at-home tips to help your rehab. Your physical therapist should discuss goals of treatment for you to help you get a sense of how they want to track progress.

In some cases, a physical therapy session may include things such as manual therapy to help relieve pain and loosen joints. Manual therapy is an outpatient procedure performed with the therapist's hands, instead of any device. Like a massage, your physical therapist will knead and press certain joints and muscles to loosen them and improve range of motion. You may experience some mild soreness or pain after a manual therapy session, but this is a normal side effect and usually goes away after a day or two.

Physical therapy is a process. You will work alongside your PT to help address problem areas while keeping track of progress with carefully outlined therapeutic goals. Not sure if physical therapy is right for you? Physical therapists on Sesame offer new-patient consultations so you can receive a physical evaluation and ask any questions you may have. Don't let aches and pains control your life- save up to 60% when you book a physical therapy visit on Sesame.

Does physical therapy help aging?

While physical therapy can help your body feel better as you age, there's one kind of physical therapy specifically designed to combat the physical fatigues associated with aging: geriatric physical therapy.

Geriatric physical therapy addresses a wide range of concerns and conditions related to aging, including complications from arthritis and osteoporosis. A geriatric physical therapist may help with physical fitness, mobility, and strength.

Some modalities of geriatric physical therapy treatment plans include:
- Aquatic aerobics
- Yoga
- Bodyweight strength training
- Gait correction
- Electrical stimulation
- Deep and/or soft tissue massage

When should I see a physical therapist?

You should see a physical therapist if you are experiencing pain related to your daily tasks. Whether you're feeling the effects of carpal tunnel or back tightness, a physical or occupational therapist can help create a treatment plan that reduces your discomfort and restores your mobility. Occupational therapists can provide exercises and stretches that specially address movements you do every day.

Back pain and joint pain is one of the leading causes of disability for Americans. Chronic pain can affect your quality of life and your ability to move freely. Don't wait to start fixing aches and soreness. Save up to 60% when you book a physical therapy visit through Sesame and get in touch with a real, quality physical therapist in Sunnyvale, CA today - no insurance needed.

Should I see a physical therapist even if I’m not injured?

Physical therapy isn't just for people with injuries. An individual may seek physical therapy services as a method of preventative medicine or general wellness care.

While physical therapy may not be immediately necessary, seeking maintenance therapy can help:
- Improve posture
- Increase body awareness
- Correct muscle imbalance
- Ease muscle tightness or pain
- Improve range of motion
- Increase mobility
- Diaphragmatic breathing
- Preparation for an athletic activity


Sesame offers affordable physical therapy visits with quality physical therapists in Sunnyvale, CA. If you are experiencing chronic pain, or want to improve your general wellness, book a visit today and save up to 60% on top-rated care from accredited physical therapists. You pay an upfront cash-pay price without the surprise bills or overhead that drives up cost.

How can I find a physical therapist near me?

Sesame's got you covered!

Connect on Sesame with a real, quality physical therapist licensed to treat patients in Sunnyvale, CA. Physical therapists on Sesame can assess your symptoms, diagnose your conditions, and craft a treatment plan that works for you - all for one affordable, upfront cost. No copays or surprise billing.

Not sure if physical therapy is the right treatment plan for you? Sesame offers affordable new-patient physical therapy consultations, so you can meet with a physical therapist to discuss options, and ask any questions you may have.

Don't let aches and pains keep you down. Save up to 60% when you book physical therapy services through Sesame today and get your wellness journey started!

What is the average cost of a physical therapy session?

It depends! Physical therapy can cost anywhere from $30 - $350, depending on the therapist you see and the modality (type) of therapy you need. Sesame offers physical therapy visits with real, quality therapists in {{ Location Name}} at affordable cash-pay prices starting at around $25. New-patient physical therapy consultations start at around $130 for a 60-minute visit.

If you have a neurological condition that affects your ability to move (stroke, Parkinson's disease, MS), you may require at-home care. At-home physical therapy services can be more expensive than a visit to a physical therapy clinic but are beneficial for patients dealing with the issues listed above.

If you're looking to start physical therapy services and don't know where to start, book a visit with a real, quality physical therapist on Sesame and save up to 60% on your first appointment - no insurance needed. Yep, you read that right: you don't need an insurance provider to get great care through Sesame. From injury prevention to back pain relief, therapists on Sesame offer individualized treatment plans to help you live life pain-free. Not sure if physical therapy is right for you? Book a new patient consultation for a physical evaluation and ask any questions you may have.

Get started on your wellness journey today with convenient and affordable physical therapy sessions on Sesame.

Can physical therapy be done at home or over video?

Physical therapy can be provided in a number of settings. Most clinicians on Sesame treat patients through outpatient clinics or private offices, but given the difficulty and health concerns some face going into a doctor’s office now, physical therapists on Sesame now offer video visits to help you diagnose and treat a range of conditions.

Who might need in-home care?

Conditions that may require a patient to receive in-home physical therapy services include:
- Loss of functional mobility from surgery or serious injury
- Stroke
- Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
- Multiple Sclerosis
- Parkinson’s disease


Connect with a physical therapist on Sesame to help find a video or in-person treatment plan that works for you.

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